All 255 items

William Jennings Bryan

Born in Illinois, William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) made his political career in Nebraska. Known as the Great Commoner, he ran unsuccessfully as a Democrat for U.S. President three times. As the leader of the Democratic Party between 1896 and 1912 he forged alliances with agrarian Populists and the labor movement. As Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson he resigned to protest what he considered the President's lack of neutrality toward the war in Europe. Later in life Bryan became a vocal critic of the theory of evolution, and an ally of the emerging Christian fundamentalist movement. In 1925 he assisted with the prosecution of Tennessee biology teacher John Scopes, facing off with Chicago lawyer Clarence Darrow.

Date
1909
Subjects
Politics
Religion
People
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish), "Custer as a White Man"

Painting on paper by the Native American artist Red Fish. The hand written caption, believed to be by Aaron McGaffey Beede who commissioned the work, reads “Custer as a white man/made by Red Fish/Indians believe Custer/has the “tonj” of an Indian.” The word “tonj” was usually translated as “spirit” in the 19th century, suggesting that Native Americans respected Custer as a fallen warrior. Another image by Red Fish (image #50) shows “Custer as a Comanche.”

Creator
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish)
Date
n.d.
Subjects
Art
Indians of North America
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Charles A. Eastman

Also known by his Dakota name Ohiyesa, Eastman grew up with his grandmother and uncle in Manitobabut became a Christian at his father's urging. He attended Knox and Dartmouth Colleges, and received a medical degree from Boston University. He married a white classmate, Elaine Goodale, and then served as a medical officer at the Pine Ridge reservation in the early 1890s.

Date
1916
Subjects
Indians of North America
Sioux
Rain-in-the-Face

This portrait of Rain-in-the-Face appeared with an article about the Battle of Little Big Horn written by Charles Eastman. Unlike his portrait in image #52, here the former Sioux warrior chose to appear in a traditional head dress.

Creator
Eastman, Charles Alexander, 1858-1939
Date
1904
Subjects
Battle of Little Big Horn
Indians of North America
Sioux
People
Rain-in-the-Face, ca. 1835-1905
Theodore Roosevelt to Edith Wyatt

Despite mixed feelings, Theodore Roosevelt officially supported women's suffrage in his 1912 presidential campaign. His discomfort with the subject is evident in a letter he wrote in reply to Chicago literary critic Edith Franklin Wyatt. Roosevelt suggests that women's suffrage might help in the fight against prostitution. He also expresses doubts about the positive effects of women's votes, however, noting that there has been little change in states that have granted them suffrage.

Creator
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Date
December 15, 1912
Subjects
Gender and society
Suffrage
People
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Ticket to "Ladies Night: An Evening with Brother Capt. Jack Crawford"

On the back of the ticket was printed a poem by Capt. Jack Crawford, 'Sunshine Boomerang.' The New York Lyceum Bureau promoted Capt. Jack Crawford as a speaker in 1910 with a testimonial from Senator Robert LaFollette, who wrote: “Capt. Jack Crawford is one of the most pleasing lecturers, the most unique and magnetic of the personalities on the lyceum platform today. His quaint philosophy, the sunshine and pathos of his poetry and stories, and the broad patriotism of his lectures make an irresistible appeal.”

Date
1910
Subjects
Advertising
Amusements
People
Crawford, Jack, 1847-1917
Cover to _What Every Girl Should Know_

The pamphlet What Every Girl Should Know is a compilation of Sanger's early articles on birth control. Sanger had been prosecuted for transmitting “obscene” materials through the mail. By the 1920s, the federal government loosened its enforcement on mailing birth control information, although the obscenity laws were not formally overturned until the 1960s.

Creator
Sanger, Margaret
Date
1922
Subjects
Gender and society
Law
Cover to _International Socialist Review_, November 1915

Published by Charles H. Kerr Co. from 1900 to 1918, the International Socialist Review became the principal voice of the Socialist Party's left wing, utilizing the format of a mass circulation magazine.

Date
February 1916
Subjects
Labor unions
Socialism
Strikes
Working class
Items for Passengers Going Across the Continent

A page from the guidebook “How to Go West” details the prices for passengers and freight traveling across North America in the early 1870s. Sleeping cars were reserved for 1st class passengers only. Second class and emigrant class passengers rode in less elegant accommodations and were advised to bring “a lunch basket” for a trip lasting several days from Omaha to San Francisco.

Date
1872
Subjects
Advertisement
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Pullman cars
Railroads
Tourism
Terrorism

In coordinated raids organized by Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer across the nation during January 1920, federal and local law enforcement officials arrested thousands of radicals, trade union militants, and immigrants. Officials warned that this breach of civil liberties was necessary because radicals were plotting to overthrow the government. In response, the Chicago Federation of Labor's newspaper attacked Palmer's Red Raids as employer-inspired retribution for the massive strikes that had paralyzed industry during 1919.

Creator
Chicago Federation of Labor
Date
January 10, 1920
Subjects
Civil rights
Labor