All 255 items

Speech of John Hossack on the Fugitive Slave Law

The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 required the federal government to assist with retrieving runaway slaves even in free states like Illinois. In an act of civil disobedience, businessman John Hossack and seven others helped a runaway slave named Jim Grey escape from federal custody just as he was about to be sent back South. Convicted in a Chicago court, Hossack paid a $100 fine and spent ten days in jail, although he was released each day to dine with Chicago officials and prominent citizens. In his strongly worded defense, Hossack argued, “the parties who prostituted the constitution to the support of slavery, are traitors.”

Creator
Hossack, John
Date
1860
Subjects
Law
Slavery
Indian shooting fish

A Native American man crouches at the bank of a river. He holds a bow and arrow and aims at the water.

Creator
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Date
1853
Subjects
Fishing
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
Emigrant Party on the Road to California

Hearing about the discovery of gold in California, many people headed westward along the Oregon-California Trail.

Date
1850
Subjects
Emigration and immigration
Gold Rush
Places
California
Utah
Portrait of Henry Belland, "the Voyageur"

Frank Blackwell Mayer was a Baltimore artist who traveled independently in 1851 to Minnesota to observe and sketch the Sioux Indians present at treaty negotiations at Traverse des Sioux and Mendota. In May of 1851 Mayer left Maryland and journeyed via the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Missouri, St. Paul, and Fort Snelling. After visiting Kaposia he accompanied the treaty commissioners to Traverse des Sioux, arriving June 30. Mayer returned to Baltimore by October, having recorded impressions of his travels in a series of sketchbooks and a diary.

Creator
Mayer, Frank Blackwell, 1827-1899
Date
1851
Subjects
Fur trade
Places
Minnesota
People
Mayer, Frank Blackwell, 1827-1899
Fort Mackinac on Mackinac Island

Seth Eastman produced watercolor drawings to illustrate Henry Rowe Schoolcraft's Historical and Statistical Information Respecting the History, Condition and Prospects of the Indian Tribes of the United States (Philadelphia : Lippincott, Grambo & Company, (successors to Grigg, Elliot & Co.), 1853).

Creator
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Date
1853
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Fort Mackinac (Mackinac Island, Mich.)
People
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, 1793-1864
Log Cabin meeting houses

This lithograph shows the succession of buildings that served Presbyterians in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Creator
P.S. Deuval and Co.
Date
1854
Subjects
Log cabins
Visions of history
Places
Pennsylvania
Pioneers Entering Kentucky

This drawing appeared in an account of Daniel Boone's early settlement in Kentucky that emphasized the hostility of American Indians to the newcomers.

Date
1856
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Places
Kentucky
Nauvoe, Illinois

Mormons fleeing persecution in New York State and then Missouri settled in Nauvoo after 1832, building it up to one of the largest cities in Illinois by the mid-1840s. In 1846 other Illinois residents expelled the Mormons, who headed west for Utah. The Mormon temple on the hill in the distance burned down in 1848. Artist Henry Lewis sketched and painted scenes along the Mississippi River between 1846 and 1848. He compiled them into a great panoramic painting of the river that was a popular attraction in the U.S. and Europe. Later he settled in Germany where he published an illustrated account of his travels.

Creator
Lewis, Henry, 1819-1904
Date
1857
Subjects
Mormons
Religion
Theater
Places
Illinois
Mississippi River Valley
Rollende Prairie

Artist Henry Lewis sketched and painted scenes along the upper Mississippi River between 1846 and 1848. He compiled them into a panoramic painting nearly half a mile in length, which was a popular theater attraction in the U.S. and Europe. Later he settled in Germany where he published a book based on his panorama.

Creator
Lewis, Henry, 1819-1904
Date
1857
Subjects
Indians of North America
Theater
Places
Great Plains
Mississippi River Valley
The Falls of St. Anthony

Artist Henry Lewis sketched and painted scenes along the upper Mississippi River between 1846 and 1848. He compiled them into a panoramic painting nearly half a mile in length, which was a popular theater attraction in the U.S. and Europe. Later he settled in Germany where he published a book based on his panorama. He began at the Falls of St. Anthony in Minnesota, which became the site of Minneapolis.

Creator
Lewis, Henry, 1819-1904
Date
1857
Subjects
Indians of North America
Theater
Places
Minnesota
Mississippi River Valley