All 255 items

Route of the Mormon Pioneers from Nauvoo to Great Salt Lake

Seeking to escape harassment, Mormons left their embattled settlement in Nauvoo, Illinois, in 1846, reaching their destination in the Valley of the Great Salt Lake a year later.

Date
1899
Subjects
Emigration and immigration
Mormons
Visions of history
Places
West (U.S.)
Rain-in-the-Face. Sioux.

Rain-in-the-Face was among the Sioux warriors who defeated the U.S. Army under George Custer at the Battle of Little Big Horn. In this portrait by the painter Eldridge Ayer Burbank he is dressed in a Euro-American suit, unlike the portrait in image #195.

Creator
Burbank, E. A. (Elbridge Ayer), 1858-1949
Date
1898
Subjects
Battle of Little Big Horn
Indians of North America
Sioux
Places
South Dakota
People
Rain-in-the-Face, ca. 1835-1905
College of Complexes logo

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum. This image captures one of the College's logos.

Creator
Pastin, Pat
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish), "Custer as a Comanche"

Undated painting on cardboard with an annotation, “Custer as a Comanche.” A similar painting (image #202) depicts “Custer as a White Man.”

Creator
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish)
Date
n.d.
Subjects
Art
Indians of North America
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Custer's Last Battle in New Light

In 1927 William Hale Thompson, the mayor of Chicago, had been elected to a third term after vigorously attacking school history textbooks as too pro-British. He sought to commission the writing of a new textbook that would be more “American.” A delegation of Sioux visited Thompson in December 1927 to make the case that a new textbook should correct misleading accounts of American Indian history, including the battle at Little Big Horn.

Creator
Lorenz, Alma
Date
1927
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Education
Indians of North America
Political campaigns
Visions of history
Places
Chicago
Little Bighorn Battlefield (Mont.)
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Child of the Dead and Forgotten Gods

Born on a Mississippi plantation in 1908, Richard Wright moved to Chicago in 1927. While working in the Post Office he joined the Communist Party's cultural organization, the John Reed Club in order to develop his writing. In 1934, he published two poems in Jack Conroy's literary journal Anvil—not his first publication as Conroy typed at the top of this page, but his first in a magazine that claimed national circulation. Wright went on to write the best-selling novels Native Son and Black Boy. He left the Communist Party in the 1940s, and lived in France until his death in 1960.

Creator
Wright, Richard
Date
1934
Subjects
Communism
Literature
Working class
Dill Pickle Club House and Chapel

A handbill advertises three plays at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club. An inset map shows artists' studios nearby. The plays touched on social and political issues including labor conflict, abortion, drug use, and Irish nationalism.

Date
1927
Subjects
Advertisements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Strikes
Theater
Places
Chicago, Illinois
An Indian trapper

A depiction of an Indian on horseback in a mountainous landscape. Theodore Dodge described the “Indian Trapper” as a common character in the northern Rocky Mountains before the 1860s: a contract worker for the Hudson's Bay Company hunting furs for the European market.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Fur trade
Horsemanship
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
Plain Crees driving buffaloes into a pound

This illustration accompanies Henry Hind's description of how Cree Indians captured buffalo for slaughter. In the distance a circular “pound” or corral is visible.

Date
1860
Subjects
Cree Indians
Hunting
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
Manitoba
Title page and annotated flyleaf to _Biographical History of Shelby and Audubon Counties, Iowa_

In the late nineteenth century publishers compiled histories and biographical dictionaries for counties throughout the Midwest. Residents often paid for their biographies to be included. In this copy a family has kept track of its genealogy, with reference to a biography in the volume as well as to relatives in Hull, England and Wheeling, West Virginia.

Date
1889
Places
Iowa