All 255 items

Anti-War Dance, 1918

Chicagoans organized many protests against American involvement in World War I, including this Anti-War Dance sponsored by the bohemian Dill Pickle Club. Critics of the war charged that large manufacturers were the most likely to profit from the war while workers were the most likely to die in the trenches. The war deeply divided Chicago's radicals. Some believed that it was necessary to remain loyal to the government once Congress declared war. Others urged active resistance to mobilization and the draft.

Date
1918
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
World War I
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Across the Continent

Frances Palmer, who migrated from her native England to the United States in 1842 at the age of 30, was an artist who created some of the most popular lithographs sold by the Currier and Ives partnership.

Creator
Currier, Charles, 1818-1887
Ives, James Merritt, d. 1895.
Date
1868
Subjects
Empire
Frontier and pioneer life
Transportation
Visions of history
Fishing Lakes, Qu' Appelle River

Henry Youle Hind, a chemistry and geology professor at Toronto's Trinity College, led an expedition that explored the Red and Assiniboine Rivers in southern Manitoba and the Qu'Appelle River in southern Saskatchewan. Hind's travel accounts, along with those of the contemporaneous Palliser expedition (1857-1860), helped promote the idea of Canada's prairies as a site for future colonization.

Creator
Hind, Henry Youle, 1823-1908
Date
1860
Subjects
Fishing
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
Manitoba
Karte von Michigan

John Farmer became the premier cartographer of Michigan in the early nineteenth century, publishing his first map of the state in 1826. This 1834 map, published in German, indicates the location of a number of Native American settlements. Maps like this would have been used by prospective settlers hoping to identify suitable land in the territory.

Creator
Farmer, John, 1798-1859
Date
1834
Subjects
Immigration
Indians of North America
Mapping
Places
Michigan
Cheap Farms for Settlers

A broadside advertising land for sale in western Iowa. In addition to selling farm land, the American Emigrant Company recruited European workers and farmers to migrate to the western United States, arranged their travel and work contracts, and handled money sent home by immigrants. Prominent business and political leaders were major investors in the company.

Date
1865
Subjects
Advertisements
Education
Farming
Immigration
Railroads
Places
Iowa
Imaginary view of the site of Chicago in 1779

This vision of some of Chicago's earliest residents was the first image in A.T. Andreas' 1886 History of Chicago. The caption notes, the site was then known as “Eschicago” and identifies the building on the north shore of the river as the cabin of Afro-French trader Jean Baptiste Point De Sable. Since the 1600s the area around the mouth of the Chicago River had been a trading ground for various Native American groups, French traders, and their mixed-race descendants.

Creator
Andreas, A. T. (Alfred Theodore), 1839-1900
Date
1884
Subjects
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Visions of history
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago American Indian Conference, 1961

In 1961, a week-long gathering at the University of Chicago attracted hundreds of Indian people from across the country. The Chicago American Indian Conference resulted in a Declaration of Indian Purpose and helped mobilize a generation of Indian activists. This photograph illustrates both the broad representation at the conference and the growing strains of generational conflict. Attendees included Irene Mack (Menominee) at the microphone; fourth row right Father Peter Powell; third row right, second from aisle Clyde Warrior (Ponca), Mel Thom (Northern Pauite), and Leo La Clair (Muckleshoot).

Creator
Weil, F. Peter
Date
1961
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Front View of the American Fur Company Buildings, Fond du Lac

Thomas McKenney accompanied Lewis Cass, the governor of the Michigan Territory, to the far west of Lake Superior during the summer of 1826 to meet with American Indian leaders and search for the source of the Mississippi River. This drawing shows the American Fur Trading Company post including a fenced garden area. In his description of the post, McKenney identified separate cemetaries for whites and American Indians behind the garden.

Date
1827
Subjects
Agriculture
American Fur Company
Fur trade
Places
Fond du Lac (Duluth, Minn.)
Heroism of a Pioneer Woman

A tableau of frontier violence. This image accompanied the tale of a 1791 attack on the John Merrill home in Kentucky in which Mrs. Merrill killed five attackers with her ax. Along with stories of white settlers taken captive by American Indians, images like this portrayed settlers as victims of Indian aggression and celebrated the strength of settler women as a sign of the strength of the young American nation.

Date
1860
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Gender and society
Indians of North America
Violence
Places
Mississippi River Valley
West (U.S.)
A Tale of Three Actors

Studs Terkel, Oscar Brown, and Fred Pinkard working together in a play protesting the hydrogen bomb. Pinkard work on WMAQ's “Destination Freedom.”

Creator
Morris, Jim
Date
1958
Subjects
Theater
Places
Chicago (Ill.)