All 255 items

Capture of Louis Riel by the Scouts Armstrong and Howie, May 15, 1885

Louis Riel was a Métis leader who headed a provisional government in opposition to the Canadian government in 1885. The “Riel Rebellion” was defeated militarily and Riel was convicted of treason and executed.

Date
1885
Subjects
Metis
Riel Rebellion, 1885
Places
Canada
Saskatchewan
People
Riel, Louis, 1844-1885
Underground Routes to Canada

Map showing routes used by African Americans fleeing slavery in the American South to free states in the North and to Canada. Before the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, African Americans who escaped slavery could live and work in relative freedom in northern states, although they usually did not have full political equality. After 1850 many of these Americans moved on to Canada where slavery had been abolished in 1834.

Date
1899
Subjects
Emancipation
Slavery
Underground Railroad
Places
Canada
Dubuque in Iowa

A long time site of lead mining, in the 1840s Dubuque was a commercial center along the upper Mississippi River. Artist Henry Lewis sketched and painted scenes along the upper Mississippi River between 1846 and 1848. He compiled them into a panoramic painting nearly half a mile in length, which was a popular theater attraction in the U.S. and Europe. Later he settled in Germany where he published a book based on his panorama.

Creator
Lewis, Henry, 1819-1904
Date
1857
Subjects
Industry
Mining
Theater
Places
Iowa
Mississippi River Valley
Letter certifying Christina Olson as Turkish performer at World's Columbian Exposition, 1893

Twelve-year-old Christina Olson performed as a dancer in the Turkish Theater, Midway Plaisance, World's Columbian Exposition, for the summer of 1893. This letter of recommendation, signed by the theater's managers, reads in part, “She has studied the Turkish and Oriental dance and practiced it in the said theater and proved after all to attain a recommendable degree of dance worthy of approval by all the Turks.”

Date
1893
Subjects
Christina Olson
Dance
Theater
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
American Fur Company's factory, Lake Superior

The first page of an eight page supplement to the December 1842 edition of Saturday Magazine, printed in London, England. The supplement traces the development and progression of the fur trade, suggesting the international interest in the commerce of central North America.

Date
1842
Subjects
American Fur Company
Fur trade
Places
Fond du Lac (Duluth, Minn.)
Lake Superior
Cover of _Clason's Touring Atlas of the United States and Canada_

Clason's Touring Atlas of the United States and Canada featured maps, tourist attractions, and “the best routes to the wonders of America.” The Clason Map Co. also produced “Clason's Green Guides” with in-depth information by state. The front cover of this map pictures an Indian waving as a car speeds past. One of the passengers, perhaps a young boy, waves back.

Creator
Clason Map Company
Date
1920
Subjects
Atlases
Tourism
Visions of history
Places
Canada
United States
Schauplatz des Kriegs zwischen Engelland und seinen Collonien in America, 1776

This map of the “Arena of the War between England and her Colonies in America” was published in Frankfurt, Germany, in 1776, at the beginning of that war. The names of American Indian tribes are visible across the Great Lakes region.

Creator
Jaeger, Johann Christian
Date
1776
Subjects
Indians of North America
Revolutionary War
Places
United States
Eunice Tietjens

Eunice Hammond Tietjens (1884-1944) poses in a robe that suggests her interest in the cultures of Asia. Tietjens was long associated with the literary and artistic circle around Harriet Monroe's Poetry Magazine. The daughter of a prominent family, she had an unconventional education in Europe, traveled to Japan, China, and the South Pacific as an adult, and developed an interest in eastern philosophies and religions. At different times she was a poet, novelist, journalist, author of children's books, lecturer, and editor.

Subjects
Literature
Places
Chicago, Illinois
People
Tietjens, Eunice
I Await the Devil's Coming

Nineteen-year-old Mary MacLane from Butte, Montana, may have been the original flapper. She wrote “I Await the Devil's Coming” and sent it to Chicago's Stone and Kimball Company. When it appeared in print in 1902, re-titled The Story of Mary MacLane, the book sparked controversy with its references to the author's sexual longings. Literary critics proclaimed it a work of refreshing openness, while more traditional readers thought it improper for a young woman. For a time, her name became synonymous with female sexuality. MacLane went on to write several other books and to act in early films. Never married, she lived in Chicago until her death in 1929.

Creator
MacLane, Mary
Date
1901
Subjects
Gender and society
Literature
Places
Montana
Tippecanoe, the Hero of North Bend

Sheet music published during William Henry Harrison's campaign for president in 1840 recalled his role in the battle at Tippecanoe Creek in Indiana in 1811. Harrison was then governor of the Indiana Territory and led an attack on Indians led by Tecumseh and his brother, the Shawnee Prophet.

Date
1849
Subjects
Log cabins
Political campaigns
Sheet music
Places
Indiana