All 255 items

Chief American Horse, Northern Cheyenne

Oil on canvas. Signed “E.A. Burbank, Lame Deer, Mont., 1897.”

Creator
Burbank, E. A. (Elbridge Ayer), 1858-1949
Date
1897
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Places
Montana
People
American Horse, Dakota Chief, 1840-1908
A Squad of Genuine Cuban Insurgents

When the United States declared war on Spain in 1898 it was in part to support the independence movement in Cuba. For William Cody, the good-versus-evil struggle in Cuba mirrored the dramas of western combat he regularly presented in his Wild West Shows.

Creator
Courier Litho. Co., Buffalo, N.Y.
Date
1898
Subjects
Empire
Wild west shows
Cover to _The Charge of the Rough Riders: Grand Galop Militaire_

This song celebrated the role of Colonel Theodore Roosevelt and his Rough Riders in the Spanish American War of 1898.

Date
1898
Subjects
Sheet music
Places
Puerto Rico
People
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Rain-in-the-Face. Sioux.

Rain-in-the-Face was among the Sioux warriors who defeated the U.S. Army under George Custer at the Battle of Little Big Horn. In this portrait by the painter Eldridge Ayer Burbank he is dressed in a Euro-American suit, unlike the portrait in image #195.

Creator
Burbank, E. A. (Elbridge Ayer), 1858-1949
Date
1898
Subjects
Battle of Little Big Horn
Indians of North America
Sioux
Places
South Dakota
People
Rain-in-the-Face, ca. 1835-1905
Annie Oakley

The sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860-1926) was born Phoebe Ann Moses to a poor Ohio farming family. To feed and support her family she learned to trap and shoot, and later performed shooting tricks on stage. She became a regular part of William Cody's Wild West Show in 1885. This portrait from 1899 suggests how Oakley stretched the conventional roles for women in the late 19th century as an expert shooter, although she always wore a skirt and rode sidesaddle in deference to audiences expectations.

Creator
Fox, Richard, K.
Date
1899
Subjects
Gender and society
Theater
Wild West Show
Underground Routes to Canada

Map showing routes used by African Americans fleeing slavery in the American South to free states in the North and to Canada. Before the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, African Americans who escaped slavery could live and work in relative freedom in northern states, although they usually did not have full political equality. After 1850 many of these Americans moved on to Canada where slavery had been abolished in 1834.

Date
1899
Subjects
Emancipation
Slavery
Underground Railroad
Places
Canada
I Await the Devil's Coming

Nineteen-year-old Mary MacLane from Butte, Montana, may have been the original flapper. She wrote “I Await the Devil's Coming” and sent it to Chicago's Stone and Kimball Company. When it appeared in print in 1902, re-titled The Story of Mary MacLane, the book sparked controversy with its references to the author's sexual longings. Literary critics proclaimed it a work of refreshing openness, while more traditional readers thought it improper for a young woman. For a time, her name became synonymous with female sexuality. MacLane went on to write several other books and to act in early films. Never married, she lived in Chicago until her death in 1929.

Creator
MacLane, Mary
Date
1901
Subjects
Gender and society
Literature
Places
Montana
Mary MacLane

Nineteen-year-old Mary MacLane from Butte, Montana, may have been the original flapper. She wrote “I Await the Devil's Coming” and sent it to Chicago's Stone and Kimball Company. When it appeared in print in 1902, re-titled The Story of Mary MacLane, the book sparked controversy with its references to the author's sexual longings. Literary critics proclaimed it a work of refreshing openness, while more traditional readers thought it improper for a young woman. For a time, her name became synonymous with female sexuality. MacLane went on to write several other books and to act in early films, one based on her book Men Who Have Made Love To Me. Never married, MacLane lived in Chicago until her death in 1929.

Date
1903
People
MacLane, Mary
Types and Development of Man

An illustration from the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, conveys the racialist thinking common at the time.

Creator
Buel, James W., 1849-1920
Date
1904
Subjects
World's Fair, St. Louis, 1904
Rain-in-the-Face

This portrait of Rain-in-the-Face appeared with an article about the Battle of Little Big Horn written by Charles Eastman. Unlike his portrait in image #52, here the former Sioux warrior chose to appear in a traditional head dress.

Creator
Eastman, Charles Alexander, 1858-1939
Date
1904
Subjects
Battle of Little Big Horn
Indians of North America
Sioux
People
Rain-in-the-Face, ca. 1835-1905