All 255 items

Fur trade contract, 1692

Fur trade contract, dated Sept. 15, 1692 in Ville-Marie, Québec, concerning transport of merchandise to Michilimackinac and Chicago to be traded for beaver pelts. The contract describes an agreement between François Francoeur dit Lavalle—represented here by his wife Marie Magdeleine St.-Jean, authorized by him to conduct their joint business affairs while he was away “aux Illinois”—and four voyageurs: Simon Guillory, Jean Baptiste Jarry, Louis Roy, and by proxy, Simon Roy. For 500 livres each in beaver pelts, and their food, the voyageurs agreed to make the journey to Michilimackinac and “Chicagou” (one of the earliest references to Chicago in a voyageur contract) the following spring, in two canoes to be furnished by them, to transport merchandise, and to make the return with beaver pelts. At each of the trading centers, the four voyageurs have permission to use one of the canoes to trade 300 livres of merchandise each for personal profit. There are also provisions concerning voyageurs “hyvernants,” those who spend the winter out in trapping country in Illinois. The contract includes Francoeur's footnotes in margins, marked in the text with a sequence of carats and circles. Each addition is initialed by two or three of the parties involved, and the document is signed by St.-Jean and Guillory; the notary, Maugue; and witnesses Jean Legras and Adrien Betouni. Jarry and Roy did not sign, as they did not know how to write their names.

Creator
Francoeur, François
Guillory, Simon
Jarry, Jean Baptiste
Roy, Louis
Roy, Simon
St.-Jean, Marie Magdeleine
Date
1692
Subjects
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Fort Michilimackinac (Mackinaw City, Mich.)
French Canada
Great Lakes
Québec
People
Francoeur dit Lavalle, François
Fur trade contract, 1721

Signed contract, dated June 5, 1721 in Villemarie [Ile de Montréal, Québec], between Gilles Chauvin, Pierre Hubert Lacroix (and by proxy, Jacques Hubert Lacroix), associates of the Compagnies des Indes, and Pierre-Charles de Liette, in which the associates agree to provide de Liette with a canoe and guides for his journey from Montréal in exchange for two safe conduct passes. In the face of an impending investigation by the French government into the activities of the failing Compagnie des Indes, de Liette has resigned his commissions, and plans to leave Montréal. The commanding general has given him two passes which he signs over to Gilles Chauvin and Pierre Lacroix on the eve of their departure to the upper territories. In return, they agree to furnish de Liette with a canoe and four voyageur-guides as far as Fort Michilimackinac in Michigan, at which point de Liette will exchange canoes and receive two other guides to continue on to his final destination. De Liette is also obliged to see that the canoe and the guides are returned to Michilimakinac the following spring. The contract is signed by de Liette, Chauvin, Pierre Hubert Lacroix, local witnesses Théophile Barthe and Andre Dorien, and “notaire royal,” Jacques David.

Creator
Liette, Pierre de, d. 1721
Date
1721
Subjects
Canoes and canoeing
Compagnie des Indes
Fur trade
Places
Fort Michilimackinac (Mackinaw City, Mich.)
French Canada
Montréal (Québec)
Ville-Marie (Québec)
People
Chauvin, Gilles
Lacroix, Jacques Hubert
Lacroix, Pierre Hubert
Liette, Pierre de
Gilpin's Hydrographic Map of North America

William Gilpin moved west from Philadelphia in the 1830s, and became an indefatigable promoter of the West as a lecturer, writer, and as editor of the Missouri Daily Argus. He saw America as destined to become the center of the next great phase of civilization, and saw the Mississippi Valley as the heart of that civilization. Gilpin's 1848 hydrographic map enlarged the Mississippi basin and pushed the Rocky Mountains west of their actual position. In 1861 he became the first governor of the Colorado Territory.

Creator
Gilpin, William, 1813-1894
Date
1848
Grain elevators, Central Illinois

Two grain elevator facilities west of Champaign, Illinois. On the left, the larger facility is that of The Andersons Grain and Ethanol Group. On the right, the much smaller Rising Farmers Grain Company.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Agriculture
Industry
Places
Illinois
Grand Palace, Decatur, Illinois

The Heartland Community Church in Decatur, Illinois, operates the Grand Palace as a banquet hall. The architecture and advertising of the facility evoke both frontier themes and the notion of midwestern hospitality and simplicity.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Advertising
Businesses
Visions of history
Haymarket monument, Chicago

In 2004 the city of Chicago dedicated a monument to commemorate the anarchist labor leaders arrested in the wake of a bomb explosion in Haymarket Square on May 4, 1886. Behind the monument a giant advertisement for a luxury SUV covers the entire wall of a building.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2004
Subjects
Advertising
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Labor
Haymarket Monument, Waldheim Cemetery

A monument to four anarchist labor leaders executed in Chicago on November 11, 1887. After a trial that is generally considered a miscarriage of justice, the men were convicted of killing police with a bomb. The words at the base of the statue are those of Albert Parsons, “The day will come when our silence will be more powerful than the voices you are throttling today.” Other important labor and radical leaders, including Emma Goldman, chose to be buried near this monument.

Creator
Weinert, Albert
Subjects
Anarchism
Labor unions
Radicalism
Visions of history
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Heartland Community Church, Decatur, Illinois

The Heartland Community Church in Decatur, Illinois, is across the street from a mill belonging to the Archer Daniels Midland Company, a major agricultural processing company.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Industry
Religion
Places
Decatur, Illinois
Help Lift the Lid

An advertisement for an evening at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club.

Date
[1920 or 1926]
Subjects
Advertising
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Entertainment
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Heroism of a Pioneer Woman

A tableau of frontier violence. This image accompanied the tale of a 1791 attack on the John Merrill home in Kentucky in which Mrs. Merrill killed five attackers with her ax. Along with stories of white settlers taken captive by American Indians, images like this portrayed settlers as victims of Indian aggression and celebrated the strength of settler women as a sign of the strength of the young American nation.

Date
1860
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Gender and society
Indians of North America
Violence
Places
Mississippi River Valley
West (U.S.)