All 255 items

Photograph of Lucy Parsons

Parsons self-identified as Native American and Chicana. Her family said she was black. Parsons grew up in Texas where she met Albert Richard Parsons in 1869. They married in 1872, although there is not a marriage license on record, and they moved to Chicago in 1873. Lucy Parsons was a prominent figure in Chicago's anarchist and radical labor circles until her death in 1942.

Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Parsons, Lucy
Memorandum regarding the Till murder trial, September 13, 1955, _Chicago Sun-Times_.

While visiting his relatives in Mississippi during the summer of 1955, fourteen-year old Chicagoan Emmett Till was lynched for allegedly whistling at a white woman. Till's mother insisted on bringing her son's body back to Chicago and having an open casket funeral. Thousands of black Chicagoans came to bear witness to his brutal killing, and Jet magazine published dramatic images of Till's battered body. The state of Mississippi brought charges of murder against two white men, and an all-white jury quickly found them not guilty. The Department of Justice has recently re-opened an investigation into the case.

Date
1955
Subjects
African American Life
Civil rights
Journalism
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Southern States
People
Till, Emmitt
Agricultural building at night, from northwest, 1893 World's Fair

A leading photographer of the American West, Jackson made the official set of views for the Exposition.

Creator
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942
Date
1895
Subjects
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Margaret Sanger's Chicago speaking engagements, 1916

In 1913 and 1914 New Yorker Margaret Sanger published several articles on birth control, venereal disease, and women's rights that resulted in federal obscenity charges against her. When the charges were dropped in 1916 Sanger toured the country giving lectures promoting birth control. Chicagoan Margaret C. Anderson, editor of The Little Review, was an ardent supporter of birth control, and used her magazine to promote Sanger's lectures.

Date
1916
Subjects
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
College of Complexes curriculum, June 1963

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum, as these issues of the College's newsletter, The Curriculum, suggest.

Date
June 1963
Subjects
Amusements
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
The Riot at Forty-Ninth Street, 1894

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Dill Pickle Lending Library

Among Chicago's most unusual contributions to the culture of modern urban life was the Dill Pickle Club, located at 18 Tooker Alley just east of Bughouse Square. Operating as a coffeehouse, art gallery, and speakeasy, 'The Pickle' welcomed hoboes, prostitutes, professors, and every variety of nonconformist passing through Chicago. The club hosted weekend jazz dance parties and little theater productions of Strindberg, Ibsen, O'Neill, and local playwrights. It hosted serious lectures by university professors and spoof debates staged for pure entertainment. In its early years, the Pickle was a meeting place for some of Chicago's most famous authors, intellectuals, and radicals, including Carl Sandburg, Sherwood Anderson, Floyd Dell, Clarence Darrow, Ben Reitman, Lucy Parsons, Ralph Chaplin, Ben Hecht, Harriet Monroe, and Vachel Lindsay.

Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Letter certifying Christina Olson as Turkish performer at World's Columbian Exposition, 1893

Twelve-year-old Christina Olson performed as a dancer in the Turkish Theater, Midway Plaisance, World's Columbian Exposition, for the summer of 1893. This letter of recommendation, signed by the theater's managers, reads in part, “She has studied the Turkish and Oriental dance and practiced it in the said theater and proved after all to attain a recommendable degree of dance worthy of approval by all the Turks.”

Date
1893
Subjects
Christina Olson
Dance
Theater
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Anti-War Dance, 1918

Chicagoans organized many protests against American involvement in World War I, including this Anti-War Dance sponsored by the bohemian Dill Pickle Club. Critics of the war charged that large manufacturers were the most likely to profit from the war while workers were the most likely to die in the trenches. The war deeply divided Chicago's radicals. Some believed that it was necessary to remain loyal to the government once Congress declared war. Others urged active resistance to mobilization and the draft.

Date
1918
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
World War I
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Imaginary view of the site of Chicago in 1779

This vision of some of Chicago's earliest residents was the first image in A.T. Andreas' 1886 History of Chicago. The caption notes, the site was then known as “Eschicago” and identifies the building on the north shore of the river as the cabin of Afro-French trader Jean Baptiste Point De Sable. Since the 1600s the area around the mouth of the Chicago River had been a trading ground for various Native American groups, French traders, and their mixed-race descendants.

Creator
Andreas, A. T. (Alfred Theodore), 1839-1900
Date
1884
Subjects
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Visions of history
Places
Chicago (Ill.)