16 results for “Yellow Hand, 1850?-1876”

Buffalo Bill's Duel With Yellow Hand

Buffalo Bill interrupted his stage career in 1876 to become an army scout. He took the scalp of a Cheyenne warrior, Yellow Hair, whose name was mistranslated as Yellow Hand. Cody incorporated this story into his performances when he returned to the stage, and displayed Yellow Hand's scalp as a mark of authenticity.

Date
1881
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Cheyenne Indians
Frontier and pioneer life
Places
Great Plains
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Yellow Hand, 1850?-1876
Underground Routes to Canada

Map showing routes used by African Americans fleeing slavery in the American South to free states in the North and to Canada. Before the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, African Americans who escaped slavery could live and work in relative freedom in northern states, although they usually did not have full political equality. After 1850 many of these Americans moved on to Canada where slavery had been abolished in 1834.

Date
1899
Subjects
Emancipation
Slavery
Underground Railroad
Places
Canada
Indian shooting fish

A Native American man crouches at the bank of a river. He holds a bow and arrow and aims at the water.

Creator
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Date
1853
Subjects
Fishing
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
Emigrant Party on the Road to California

Hearing about the discovery of gold in California, many people headed westward along the Oregon-California Trail.

Date
1850
Subjects
Emigration and immigration
Gold Rush
Places
California
Utah
Speech of John Hossack on the Fugitive Slave Law

The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 required the federal government to assist with retrieving runaway slaves even in free states like Illinois. In an act of civil disobedience, businessman John Hossack and seven others helped a runaway slave named Jim Grey escape from federal custody just as he was about to be sent back South. Convicted in a Chicago court, Hossack paid a $100 fine and spent ten days in jail, although he was released each day to dine with Chicago officials and prominent citizens. In his strongly worded defense, Hossack argued, “the parties who prostituted the constitution to the support of slavery, are traitors.”

Creator
Hossack, John
Date
1860
Subjects
Law
Slavery
March of the Caravan

The author and engraver described the view of a caravan passing along the Santa Fe trail in what is now New Mexico: “As the caravan was passing under the northern base of the Round Mound, it presented a very fine and imposing spectacle to those who were upon its summit. The wagons marched slowly in four parallel columns, but in broken lines, often at intervals of many rods between them.” (pp. 101-102)

Creator
Gregg, Josiah, 1806-1850
Date
1844
Subjects
Emigration and immigration
Indians of North America
Places
Great Plains
Custer's Last Rally

In the preface to the book, the author, T. M. Newson, claims, “Most scenes described, and nearly all the incidents narrated, in the pages of this book, were part of my own personal experience of a residence of some thirty years on the frontier, and for which I can vouch as true, except, perhaps, the incidents of the last great battle of the lamented Custer with Sitting Bull, and for these I am indebted to one who was early on the ground after the conflict, and who has obtained from the Indians themselves what I deem to be a very accurate picture of the terrible struggle between contending forces.”

Date
1884
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Indians of North America
Places
Little Bighorn Battlefield (Mont.)
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Sitting Bull, 1834?-1890
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish), "Custer as a White Man"

Painting on paper by the Native American artist Red Fish. The hand written caption, believed to be by Aaron McGaffey Beede who commissioned the work, reads “Custer as a white man/made by Red Fish/Indians believe Custer/has the “tonj” of an Indian.” The word “tonj” was usually translated as “spirit” in the 19th century, suggesting that Native Americans respected Custer as a fallen warrior. Another image by Red Fish (image #50) shows “Custer as a Comanche.”

Creator
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish)
Date
n.d.
Subjects
Art
Indians of North America
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Profile of Custer

The title page of Custer's memoir characterized it as “Being a Complete History of Indian Life, Warfare, and Adventure in America. Making Specially Prominent the Late Indian War, with Full Descriptions of The Messiah Craze, Ghost Dance, Life of Sitting Bull. The Whole Forms an Authentic and Complete History of the Savage Races in America-their Illustrious Leaders, Their Beliefs, Manners, and Customs, comprising Terrible Battles, Wonderful Escapes, Thrilling Tales of Heroism, Daring Exploits, Wonderful Fortitude, etc. etc.”

Date
1891
Places
Great Plains
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish), "Custer as a Comanche"

Undated painting on cardboard with an annotation, “Custer as a Comanche.” A similar painting (image #202) depicts “Custer as a White Man.”

Creator
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish)
Date
n.d.
Subjects
Art
Indians of North America
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876