50 results for “West (U.S.)”

Gilpin's Hydrographic Map of North America

William Gilpin moved west from Philadelphia in the 1830s, and became an indefatigable promoter of the West as a lecturer, writer, and as editor of the Missouri Daily Argus. He saw America as destined to become the center of the next great phase of civilization, and saw the Mississippi Valley as the heart of that civilization. Gilpin's 1848 hydrographic map enlarged the Mississippi basin and pushed the Rocky Mountains west of their actual position. In 1861 he became the first governor of the Colorado Territory.

Creator
Gilpin, William, 1813-1894
Date
1848
Cover of "Wild West Galop for Piano"

William Cody's Wild West Shows inspired this piece of piano music from the late 1880s.

Creator
D. Emerson
Date
1888
Subjects
Sheet music
Places
West (U.S.)
View of Burlington

A view from the south of the town of Burlington, Iowa. Paddle wheel boats navigate the Mississippi River while others dock at the shore. In the foreground a locomotive crosses the iron bridge spanning the river. Steeples of the town's many churches are visible along the skyline. Printed in the guidebook “How to Go West,” the image suggests opportunities for work, trade, and community for those moving west.

Date
1872
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Railroads
Places
Iowa
Mississippi River
Photograph of Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill

A photograph of Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill as they appeared in the Wild West Show while in Montreal, Canada. In the 1870s, Sitting Bull led Sioux resistance to Euro-American settlement on the northern Great Plains, most notably defeating the U.S. Army at the Battle of Little Big Horn. After the defeat of the Sioux, Sitting Bull was confined to his reservation home except for his brief tour with William Cody's Wild West Shows in which he played himself.

Creator
Notman, William
Date
ca. 1885
Subjects
Indians of North America
Theater
Wild West Shows
Places
Montréal, Quebec
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Sitting Bull, 1834?-1890
Heroism of a Pioneer Woman

A tableau of frontier violence. This image accompanied the tale of a 1791 attack on the John Merrill home in Kentucky in which Mrs. Merrill killed five attackers with her ax. Along with stories of white settlers taken captive by American Indians, images like this portrayed settlers as victims of Indian aggression and celebrated the strength of settler women as a sign of the strength of the young American nation.

Date
1860
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Gender and society
Indians of North America
Violence
Places
Mississippi River Valley
West (U.S.)
Emigrants Crossing the Plains

A family traveling by covered wagon stops to cook a meal. In the background a line of wagons stretches to the horizon.

Date
1869
Subjects
Emigration and immigration
Gender and society
Transportation
Places
Great Plains
West (U.S.)
Emigration to the Western Country

An illustration of a caravan of emigrants, men, women, children and animals, traveling westward.

Creator
Bobbett, Albert, ca. 1824-1888 or 9
Date
1877
Subjects
Emigration and immigration
Places
West (U.S.)
Cover of _Western Life and How I Became a Bronco Buster_

The book details the author's experiences as he traveled from Liverpool, England, to California to become a bronco buster.

Creator
Quickfall, Bob Grantham
Date
1891
Subjects
Cowboys
Ranch life
Places
West (U.S.)
The Codfish and the Cattle Princess

The caption reads: “He didn't know any girls at home who dressed like men and could talk to a fellow in this frank and unconscious fashion.”

Creator
Ryerson, Florence
Date
1918
Subjects
Cowboys
Gender and society
Ranch life
Places
West (U.S.)
Route of the Mormon Pioneers from Nauvoo to Great Salt Lake

Seeking to escape harassment, Mormons left their embattled settlement in Nauvoo, Illinois, in 1846, reaching their destination in the Valley of the Great Salt Lake a year later.

Date
1899
Subjects
Emigration and immigration
Mormons
Visions of history
Places
West (U.S.)