50 results for “West (U.S.)”

Gilpin's Hydrographic Map of North America

William Gilpin moved west from Philadelphia in the 1830s, and became an indefatigable promoter of the West as a lecturer, writer, and as editor of the Missouri Daily Argus. He saw America as destined to become the center of the next great phase of civilization, and saw the Mississippi Valley as the heart of that civilization. Gilpin's 1848 hydrographic map enlarged the Mississippi basin and pushed the Rocky Mountains west of their actual position. In 1861 he became the first governor of the Colorado Territory.

Creator
Gilpin, William, 1813-1894
Date
1848
Cover of "Wild West Galop for Piano"

William Cody's Wild West Shows inspired this piece of piano music from the late 1880s.

Creator
D. Emerson
Date
1888
Subjects
Sheet music
Places
West (U.S.)
View of Burlington

A view from the south of the town of Burlington, Iowa. Paddle wheel boats navigate the Mississippi River while others dock at the shore. In the foreground a locomotive crosses the iron bridge spanning the river. Steeples of the town's many churches are visible along the skyline. Printed in the guidebook “How to Go West,” the image suggests opportunities for work, trade, and community for those moving west.

Date
1872
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Railroads
Places
Iowa
Mississippi River
Photograph of Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill

A photograph of Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill as they appeared in the Wild West Show while in Montreal, Canada. In the 1870s, Sitting Bull led Sioux resistance to Euro-American settlement on the northern Great Plains, most notably defeating the U.S. Army at the Battle of Little Big Horn. After the defeat of the Sioux, Sitting Bull was confined to his reservation home except for his brief tour with William Cody's Wild West Shows in which he played himself.

Creator
Notman, William
Date
ca. 1885
Subjects
Indians of North America
Theater
Wild West Shows
Places
Montréal, Quebec
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Sitting Bull, 1834?-1890
Souvenir program from Pawnee Bill's Historic Wild West

As William F. Cody had adopted the persona of Buffalo Bill, in the 1890s Gordon William Lillie adopted the name Pawnee Bill and started his own wild west show.

Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Wild west shows
Places
West (U.S.)
People
Pawnee Bill, 1860-1942
Cover of program for Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World

A program from Cody's Wild West Show at the World's Columbian Exposition. These dramatic open air performances highlighted the horse riding and shooting skills of Euro-American and American Indian performers, and claimed to recreate historical events such as the Battle of Little Big Horn.

Date
1893
Subjects
Theater
Wild west shows
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Title page and frontispiece to William F. Cody's _Story of the Wild West and Camp-Fire Chats_

Buffalo Bill Cody put himself in company with older iconic frontier figures in offering tales of the “Pioneer Quartette:” Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett, Kit Carson and himself. In addition to the dramatic battle scenes depicted in the frontispiece, the title page promised an account of Cody's “conquests” as a performer in England.

Creator
Cody, William Frederick, 1846-1917
Date
1888
Subjects
Wild west shows
Places
West (U.S.)
People
Boone, Daniel, 1734-1820
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Carson, Kit, 1809-1868
Cody, William Frederick, 1846-1917
Crockett, Davy, 1786-1836
Advertisement for Buffalo Bill's Wild West

One of many posters advertising William Cody's Wild West Show as a re-enactment of Euro-American conflict with American Indians.

Date
April 27, 1893
Subjects
Advertising
Wild west shows
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
United States Cavalryman

Dodge wrote of Remington's illustration: “When in the field the cavalryman is allowed some latitude in suiting his dress to his own ideas of comfort, while kept within certain regulation bounds. It is thus our artist has represented him. He is apt to wear a soft hat — there is no better campaigning hat than the slouch, as thousands of soldiers can testify — and boots ad lib.; his uniform is patterned on his own individuality after a few days march. His enormous saddle-bags are much better filled at the start than at the finish, and a couple of canteens with the indispensable tin cup are slung at the cantle. His saber he considers less useful than a revolver, and in a charge it is a question whether the latter be not by far the preferable weapon.” (p. 66)

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Horsemanship
Places
West (U.S.)
Buffalo Bill's Duel With Yellow Hand

Buffalo Bill interrupted his stage career in 1876 to become an army scout. He took the scalp of a Cheyenne warrior, Yellow Hair, whose name was mistranslated as Yellow Hand. Cody incorporated this story into his performances when he returned to the stage, and displayed Yellow Hand's scalp as a mark of authenticity.

Date
1881
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Cheyenne Indians
Frontier and pioneer life
Places
Great Plains
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Yellow Hand, 1850?-1876