29 results for “Underground Railroad”

Underground Routes to Canada

Map showing routes used by African Americans fleeing slavery in the American South to free states in the North and to Canada. Before the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, African Americans who escaped slavery could live and work in relative freedom in northern states, although they usually did not have full political equality. After 1850 many of these Americans moved on to Canada where slavery had been abolished in 1834.

Date
1899
Subjects
Emancipation
Slavery
Underground Railroad
Places
Canada
Liberty Line

Reproduced in a 1904 history of the Underground Railroad, this advertisement from an abolitionist periodical of 1844 offers free travel to Canada for those “who may wish to improve their health and circumstances.” The “Liberty Line” was not a real railroad, but a network of sympathetic northerners who helped escaped slaves flee to Canada were slavery had been abolished.

Date
1904
Subjects
Canada
Emancipation
Slavery
Underground Railroad
Children walking on railroad tracks near Knoxville, Illinois

In 1948 the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad hired two photographers to document work at the company and life in the communities it served. A series of pictures featured life on the Rader family farm near Knoxville, Illinois. Images like this one of the Rader children on their way to school were intended to show the wholesome relationship between families, communities, and the railroad corporation.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Children
Railroads
Places
Illinois
E.F. Garry to Mr. Lane on Pullman Saving Plan

In the 1920s a growing number of large industrial employers developed welfare, recreation, and representation programs for their employees. This letter, between executives of the Pullman Company, explores the possibility of a company organized savings and investment plan for workers who built, repaired, and serviced railroad cars. Written shortly after the 1922 nationwide strike of railroad shop workers, the letter offers clues as to why employers favored such welfare programs.

Date
1922
Subjects
Industry
Labor
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Railroad building on the Great Plains

Workers lay new rails across the northern Great Plains as a group of covered wagons waits to continue its trip. Appearing in the popular magazine Harper's Weekly in 1875 this picture suggests the interest of eastern readers in the expansion of Euro-American settlement into the West.

Creator
Waud, Alfred R. (Alfred Rudolph), 1828-1891
Date
July 17, 1875
Subjects
Indians of North America
Railroads
Soldiers
Transportation
Working class
Places
Great Plains
Woman with child in Union Station

A woman and child sit in the waiting room of Chicago's Union Station, 1948.

Creator
Esther Bubley
Date
1948
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Children
Railroads
Transportation
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Sleeping on the Burlington Route and Eating on the Burlington Route

Printed in a guidebook, “How to Go West,” these advertisements for Pullman cars stressed elegance, comfort, and speed. Pullman cars changed the nature of rail travel for middle and upper class travelers.

Date
1872
Subjects
Advertisement
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Pullman cars
Railroads
Tourism
Corn planting near Friend, [Nebraska]

Two farmers planting with a tractor in eastern Nebraska. Photographer Esther Bubley and her colleague Russell Lee documented daily life along the route of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad in 1948 in preparation for the book Granger Country.

Creator
Bubley, Esther
Date
1948
Subjects
Agriculture
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Places
Nebraska
Scott Rader Farm near Knoxville, Illinois

Scott Rader's four children walk behind a small herd of cattle.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Agriculture
Children
Farming
Places
Illinois
View of Burlington

A view from the south of the town of Burlington, Iowa. Paddle wheel boats navigate the Mississippi River while others dock at the shore. In the foreground a locomotive crosses the iron bridge spanning the river. Steeples of the town's many churches are visible along the skyline. Printed in the guidebook “How to Go West,” the image suggests opportunities for work, trade, and community for those moving west.

Date
1872
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Railroads
Places
Iowa
Mississippi River