7 results for “Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837”

Seven Days of the Life of a Soldier

Manuscript account by Major Alexander Thompson of a canoe journey from Green Bay to Mackinac Island, between June 1 and June 23, 1831. Accompanied by William Holiday, proprietor of an American Fur Company trading house in the interior, who was returning to headquarters in Mackinac to settle his accounts, and by eight French voyageurs or “pork-eaters,” Thompson left Green Bay on June 1, 1831 in a 30-foot bark canoe owned by the Company. As the travelers made their way around the Bay, he commented on the forests, wildlife, and the customs and legends of the Menomonee, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Winnebago Indians. Weather-bound by strong winds to their camp near Vermilion Island, Thompson hiked along some Indian trails, observing the abundant wild strawberries, roses, peas, grapes, currants, and gooseberries, and moccasin flowers, as well as bear, deer, bald eagle, and sturgeon. Strong winds were a constant hindrance throughout the trip, but finally, at Louse Island, they entered Lake Michigan, paddling at night in the moonlight to take advantage of the calm waters. They arrived at Mackinac Island on June 23rd, and were greeted by Company official Robert Stuart.

Creator
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Date
1831
Subjects
American Fur Company
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
Green Bay (Wis.)
Mackinac Island (Mich.)
People
Holiday, William
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Custer's Last Battle in New Light

In 1927 William Hale Thompson, the mayor of Chicago, had been elected to a third term after vigorously attacking school history textbooks as too pro-British. He sought to commission the writing of a new textbook that would be more “American.” A delegation of Sioux visited Thompson in December 1927 to make the case that a new textbook should correct misleading accounts of American Indian history, including the battle at Little Big Horn.

Creator
Lorenz, Alma
Date
1927
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Education
Indians of North America
Political campaigns
Visions of history
Places
Chicago
Little Bighorn Battlefield (Mont.)
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Rain-in-the-Face

This portrait of Rain-in-the-Face appeared with an article about the Battle of Little Big Horn written by Charles Eastman. Unlike his portrait in image #52, here the former Sioux warrior chose to appear in a traditional head dress.

Creator
Eastman, Charles Alexander, 1858-1939
Date
1904
Subjects
Battle of Little Big Horn
Indians of North America
Sioux
People
Rain-in-the-Face, ca. 1835-1905
Fort Mackinac on Mackinac Island

Seth Eastman produced watercolor drawings to illustrate Henry Rowe Schoolcraft's Historical and Statistical Information Respecting the History, Condition and Prospects of the Indian Tribes of the United States (Philadelphia : Lippincott, Grambo & Company, (successors to Grigg, Elliot & Co.), 1853).

Creator
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Date
1853
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Fort Mackinac (Mackinac Island, Mich.)
People
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, 1793-1864
The March of Destiny

The scene depicts “Pioneer Heroes” in a caravan heading westward. An inset in the upper left portrays migrants crossing the Appalachian mountains in Kentucky, while an inset in the bottom right corner dramatizes the search for gold in California.

Date
1883
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Gold Rush
Indians of North America
Visions of history
Places
California
Kentucky
Memorial Image of Louis Riel

A memorial to Metis leader Louis Riel who was executed by Canadian authorities on the charges of murder and treason. The imagery of cabins and a teepee suggests the close relationship between the Metis and American Indians on the Canadian Great Plains.

Date
1886
Subjects
Riel Rebellion, 1885
Visions of history
Places
Canada
Manitoba
People
Riel, Louis David
Buffalo Bill's Duel With Yellow Hand

Buffalo Bill interrupted his stage career in 1876 to become an army scout. He took the scalp of a Cheyenne warrior, Yellow Hair, whose name was mistranslated as Yellow Hand. Cody incorporated this story into his performances when he returned to the stage, and displayed Yellow Hand's scalp as a mark of authenticity.

Date
1881
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Cheyenne Indians
Frontier and pioneer life
Places
Great Plains
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Yellow Hand, 1850?-1876