32 results for “Southern States”

Memorandum regarding the Till murder trial, September 13, 1955, _Chicago Sun-Times_.

While visiting his relatives in Mississippi during the summer of 1955, fourteen-year old Chicagoan Emmett Till was lynched for allegedly whistling at a white woman. Till's mother insisted on bringing her son's body back to Chicago and having an open casket funeral. Thousands of black Chicagoans came to bear witness to his brutal killing, and Jet magazine published dramatic images of Till's battered body. The state of Mississippi brought charges of murder against two white men, and an all-white jury quickly found them not guilty. The Department of Justice has recently re-opened an investigation into the case.

Date
1955
Subjects
African American Life
Civil rights
Journalism
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Southern States
People
Till, Emmitt
Fishing Lakes, Qu' Appelle River

Henry Youle Hind, a chemistry and geology professor at Toronto's Trinity College, led an expedition that explored the Red and Assiniboine Rivers in southern Manitoba and the Qu'Appelle River in southern Saskatchewan. Hind's travel accounts, along with those of the contemporaneous Palliser expedition (1857-1860), helped promote the idea of Canada's prairies as a site for future colonization.

Creator
Hind, Henry Youle, 1823-1908
Date
1860
Subjects
Fishing
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
Manitoba
Underground Routes to Canada

Map showing routes used by African Americans fleeing slavery in the American South to free states in the North and to Canada. Before the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, African Americans who escaped slavery could live and work in relative freedom in northern states, although they usually did not have full political equality. After 1850 many of these Americans moved on to Canada where slavery had been abolished in 1834.

Date
1899
Subjects
Emancipation
Slavery
Underground Railroad
Places
Canada
Sleeping on the Burlington Route and Eating on the Burlington Route

Printed in a guidebook, “How to Go West,” these advertisements for Pullman cars stressed elegance, comfort, and speed. Pullman cars changed the nature of rail travel for middle and upper class travelers.

Date
1872
Subjects
Advertisement
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Pullman cars
Railroads
Tourism
The Switzerland of America

Appearing in a guidebook, “How to Go West,” this advertisement celebrated the healthful climate and natural beauty of the Rocky Mountains as “The Switzerland of America.”

Date
1872
Subjects
Railroads
Tourism
Places
Colorado
Great Plains
Items for Passengers Going Across the Continent

A page from the guidebook “How to Go West” details the prices for passengers and freight traveling across North America in the early 1870s. Sleeping cars were reserved for 1st class passengers only. Second class and emigrant class passengers rode in less elegant accommodations and were advised to bring “a lunch basket” for a trip lasting several days from Omaha to San Francisco.

Date
1872
Subjects
Advertisement
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Pullman cars
Railroads
Tourism
View of Burlington

A view from the south of the town of Burlington, Iowa. Paddle wheel boats navigate the Mississippi River while others dock at the shore. In the foreground a locomotive crosses the iron bridge spanning the river. Steeples of the town's many churches are visible along the skyline. Printed in the guidebook “How to Go West,” the image suggests opportunities for work, trade, and community for those moving west.

Date
1872
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Railroads
Places
Iowa
Mississippi River
Views of the Big Blue, South of Seward, Nebraska

Appearing in a guide for potential settlers, “How to Go West,” these images of rolling prairie in eastern Nebraska suggest both prosperous farms and open land for newcomers. Railroads crossing the Great Plains often advertised the availability of good land in areas served by their lines.

Date
1872
Subjects
Advertisement
Agriculture
Railroads
Places
Great Plains
Nebraska
Homesteads and Pre-Emptions

During the late 19th century the U.S. government aided settlement of farm farmers on the Great Plains by offering land at very low prices to those who would establish farms. As this description of the process indicates, immigrants seeking homestead land were required to declared their intention to become American citizen. For European immigrants this was a very small barrier.

Date
1872
Subjects
Agriculture
Immigration
Railroads
Places
Great Plains
Kansas
Nebraska
Eighth Map to accompany Willard's _History of the United States_

Maps such as these appeared in books for schoolchildren learning history and geography. Unlike earlier maps, this one presents the area west of the Appalachian Mountains as empty land.

Creator
Maverick, Samuel, 1789-1845
Date
1828
Subjects
Education
Empire
Indians of North America
Mapping
Places
United States