4 results for “Slavery”

Underground Routes to Canada

Map showing routes used by African Americans fleeing slavery in the American South to free states in the North and to Canada. Before the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, African Americans who escaped slavery could live and work in relative freedom in northern states, although they usually did not have full political equality. After 1850 many of these Americans moved on to Canada where slavery had been abolished in 1834.

Date
1899
Subjects
Emancipation
Slavery
Underground Railroad
Places
Canada
Speech of John Hossack on the Fugitive Slave Law

The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 required the federal government to assist with retrieving runaway slaves even in free states like Illinois. In an act of civil disobedience, businessman John Hossack and seven others helped a runaway slave named Jim Grey escape from federal custody just as he was about to be sent back South. Convicted in a Chicago court, Hossack paid a $100 fine and spent ten days in jail, although he was released each day to dine with Chicago officials and prominent citizens. In his strongly worded defense, Hossack argued, “the parties who prostituted the constitution to the support of slavery, are traitors.”

Creator
Hossack, John
Date
1860
Subjects
Law
Slavery
Liberty Line

Reproduced in a 1904 history of the Underground Railroad, this advertisement from an abolitionist periodical of 1844 offers free travel to Canada for those “who may wish to improve their health and circumstances.” The “Liberty Line” was not a real railroad, but a network of sympathetic northerners who helped escaped slaves flee to Canada were slavery had been abolished.

Date
1904
Subjects
Canada
Emancipation
Slavery
Underground Railroad
Emancipation Parade in Windsor, Ontario

In the 1930s residents of Windsor, Ontario, began celebrating Britain's 1833 Emancipation Act, which officially banned slavery in Canada and other parts of the British Empire.

Date
1952
Subjects
Emancipation
Places
Canada
Ontario