9 results for “September 1937”

Agriculture section, Aurora Beacon-News Centennial Edition

In 1937 the Aurora Beacon-News commemorated the centennial of Aurora, Illinois, 40 miles west of Chicago. The cover of the agricultural section represented Aurora as a trading center at the heart of an agricultural region dotted by tributary communities strung out along rail and water transportation routes.

Date
September 1937
Subjects
Advertising
Agriculture
The Codfish and the Cattle Princess

The caption reads: “He didn't know any girls at home who dressed like men and could talk to a fellow in this frank and unconscious fashion.”

Creator
Ryerson, Florence
Date
1918
Subjects
Cowboys
Gender and society
Ranch life
Places
West (U.S.)
Memorandum regarding the Till murder trial, September 13, 1955, _Chicago Sun-Times_.

While visiting his relatives in Mississippi during the summer of 1955, fourteen-year old Chicagoan Emmett Till was lynched for allegedly whistling at a white woman. Till's mother insisted on bringing her son's body back to Chicago and having an open casket funeral. Thousands of black Chicagoans came to bear witness to his brutal killing, and Jet magazine published dramatic images of Till's battered body. The state of Mississippi brought charges of murder against two white men, and an all-white jury quickly found them not guilty. The Department of Justice has recently re-opened an investigation into the case.

Date
1955
Subjects
African American Life
Civil rights
Journalism
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Southern States
People
Till, Emmitt
Haymarket monument, Chicago

In 2004 the city of Chicago dedicated a monument to commemorate the anarchist labor leaders arrested in the wake of a bomb explosion in Haymarket Square on May 4, 1886. Behind the monument a giant advertisement for a luxury SUV covers the entire wall of a building.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2004
Subjects
Advertising
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Labor
Report from M. Butler to E.M. Graham, May 11, 1937

The report of an undercover agent to the Pullman Company. Since the late 19th century, the Pullman Company employed African Americans as service workers on its sleeping cars. By the 1920s it was one of the largest industrial employers of African American workers, enjoying a reputation for paternalism. Beginning in the mid-1920s the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) under the leadership of A. Philip Randolph sought to unionize the porters and maids of the Pullman Company. Like other industrial employers, Pullman maintained an extensive network of informants who infiltrated unions and reported back to management.

Date
May 11, 1937
Subjects
African Americans
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Unions
Working class
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Labor rally poster, Du Sable High School

Unionization will advance the cause of all African Americans. So said Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) leader A. Philip Randolph at Du Sable High School in 1937, according to the Pullman Company informant who attended the meeting. Chicago's Pullman Company was a major employer of African Americans and enjoyed a reputation for paternalism toward its workers, providing good wages and an Employee Representation Plan that the company promoted as an alternative to independent unions. Beginning in the mid-1920s the BSCP worked to unionize the porters and maids working in Pullman's sleeping cars. Like other Chicago companies, Pullman maintained an extensive network of informants who infiltrated unions and reported back to management (see image #121).

Date
May 9, 1937
Subjects
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Labor unions
Pullman Company
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Randolph, A. Phillip
World Fashions Make Aurora a Style Center

In the 1920s and 1930s, the International Corset Company of Aurora, Illinois was a major manufacturer of foundation garments. During the 1920s it sponsored the International School of Scientific Corsetry to provide training to corset salespeople. For the Aurora centennial in 1937, the company boasted that its international reputation put Aurora on the map of world fashion.

Creator
Zak, Karel J.
Date
1937
Subjects
Advertising
Gender and society
Industry
Enlightened Public Opinion

During the 1930s and 1940s, the federal government sponsored a variety of adult education programs including lectures, study courses, and language instruction. This poster from the U.S. Office of Education promotes the idea that the cultivation of public opinion through these programs would contribute to orderly civic discussion and democratic self-governance. Government-sponsored discussion groups and lectures co-existed with forums organized along political or religious lines.

Creator
U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Education
Date
1938
Subjects
Citizenship
Education
Is War a Necessary Evil?

During the 1930s the U.S. Department of the Interior funded educational public forums throughout the country, promoting a vision of engaged citizenship during the Great Depression. Half a generation after World War I, Americans viewed developments in European politics with alarm. When a new World War began at the end of the decade, it displaced attention and funds from civic initiatives in adult education.

Creator
U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Education
Date
1938
Subjects
Education