12 results for “Roy, Louis”

Fur trade contract, 1692

Fur trade contract, dated Sept. 15, 1692 in Ville-Marie, Québec, concerning transport of merchandise to Michilimackinac and Chicago to be traded for beaver pelts. The contract describes an agreement between François Francoeur dit Lavalle—represented here by his wife Marie Magdeleine St.-Jean, authorized by him to conduct their joint business affairs while he was away “aux Illinois”—and four voyageurs: Simon Guillory, Jean Baptiste Jarry, Louis Roy, and by proxy, Simon Roy. For 500 livres each in beaver pelts, and their food, the voyageurs agreed to make the journey to Michilimackinac and “Chicagou” (one of the earliest references to Chicago in a voyageur contract) the following spring, in two canoes to be furnished by them, to transport merchandise, and to make the return with beaver pelts. At each of the trading centers, the four voyageurs have permission to use one of the canoes to trade 300 livres of merchandise each for personal profit. There are also provisions concerning voyageurs “hyvernants,” those who spend the winter out in trapping country in Illinois. The contract includes Francoeur's footnotes in margins, marked in the text with a sequence of carats and circles. Each addition is initialed by two or three of the parties involved, and the document is signed by St.-Jean and Guillory; the notary, Maugue; and witnesses Jean Legras and Adrien Betouni. Jarry and Roy did not sign, as they did not know how to write their names.

Creator
Francoeur, François
Guillory, Simon
Jarry, Jean Baptiste
Roy, Louis
Roy, Simon
St.-Jean, Marie Magdeleine
Date
1692
Subjects
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Fort Michilimackinac (Mackinaw City, Mich.)
French Canada
Great Lakes
Québec
People
Francoeur dit Lavalle, François
Memorial Image of Louis Riel

A memorial to Metis leader Louis Riel who was executed by Canadian authorities on the charges of murder and treason. The imagery of cabins and a teepee suggests the close relationship between the Metis and American Indians on the Canadian Great Plains.

Date
1886
Subjects
Riel Rebellion, 1885
Visions of history
Places
Canada
Manitoba
People
Riel, Louis David
Types and Development of Man

An illustration from the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, conveys the racialist thinking common at the time.

Creator
Buel, James W., 1849-1920
Date
1904
Subjects
World's Fair, St. Louis, 1904
Capture of Louis Riel by the Scouts Armstrong and Howie, May 15, 1885

Louis Riel was a Métis leader who headed a provisional government in opposition to the Canadian government in 1885. The “Riel Rebellion” was defeated militarily and Riel was convicted of treason and executed.

Date
1885
Subjects
Metis
Riel Rebellion, 1885
Places
Canada
Saskatchewan
People
Riel, Louis, 1844-1885
Beaver

This drawing depicts a beaver and a scene showing Native Americans capturing and drying the meat of wild “Beeves” (long horned beef cattle). Lahontan had visited New France with the French colonial army in the late 1780s, and his account of his travels helped shaped European perceptions of North America.

Creator
Lahontan, Louis Armand de Lom d'Arce, baron de
Date
1703
Profile of Custer

The title page of Custer's memoir characterized it as “Being a Complete History of Indian Life, Warfare, and Adventure in America. Making Specially Prominent the Late Indian War, with Full Descriptions of The Messiah Craze, Ghost Dance, Life of Sitting Bull. The Whole Forms an Authentic and Complete History of the Savage Races in America-their Illustrious Leaders, Their Beliefs, Manners, and Customs, comprising Terrible Battles, Wonderful Escapes, Thrilling Tales of Heroism, Daring Exploits, Wonderful Fortitude, etc. etc.”

Date
1891
Places
Great Plains
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Gilpin's Hydrographic Map of North America

William Gilpin moved west from Philadelphia in the 1830s, and became an indefatigable promoter of the West as a lecturer, writer, and as editor of the Missouri Daily Argus. He saw America as destined to become the center of the next great phase of civilization, and saw the Mississippi Valley as the heart of that civilization. Gilpin's 1848 hydrographic map enlarged the Mississippi basin and pushed the Rocky Mountains west of their actual position. In 1861 he became the first governor of the Colorado Territory.

Creator
Gilpin, William, 1813-1894
Date
1848
The March of Destiny

The scene depicts “Pioneer Heroes” in a caravan heading westward. An inset in the upper left portrays migrants crossing the Appalachian mountains in Kentucky, while an inset in the bottom right corner dramatizes the search for gold in California.

Date
1883
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Gold Rush
Indians of North America
Visions of history
Places
California
Kentucky
Farm residences in St. Clair County, Illinois

Representations of the farms of Ernst Dressel and Otto Schott, both in St. Clair County, Illinois, near East St. Louis, suggest subtle variations in the ways in which farmers sought to be represented to their neighbors and to history.

Date
1892
Places
Illinois
Saint Clair County (Ill.)
Buffalo Bill's Duel With Yellow Hand

Buffalo Bill interrupted his stage career in 1876 to become an army scout. He took the scalp of a Cheyenne warrior, Yellow Hair, whose name was mistranslated as Yellow Hand. Cody incorporated this story into his performances when he returned to the stage, and displayed Yellow Hand's scalp as a mark of authenticity.

Date
1881
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Cheyenne Indians
Frontier and pioneer life
Places
Great Plains
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Yellow Hand, 1850?-1876