8 results for “Religion”

Lac Superieur et autres lieux ou sont les missions des peres de la Compagnie de Iesus, comprises sous le nom d'Outaouacs

This map of the upper Great Lakes shows several Jesuit missions as well as American Indian communities.

Creator
Dablon, Claude
Date
1673
Subjects
Indians of North America
Mapping
Religion
Places
Great Lakes
Lake Superior
William Jennings Bryan

Born in Illinois, William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) made his political career in Nebraska. Known as the Great Commoner, he ran unsuccessfully as a Democrat for U.S. President three times. As the leader of the Democratic Party between 1896 and 1912 he forged alliances with agrarian Populists and the labor movement. As Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson he resigned to protest what he considered the President's lack of neutrality toward the war in Europe. Later in life Bryan became a vocal critic of the theory of evolution, and an ally of the emerging Christian fundamentalist movement. In 1925 he assisted with the prosecution of Tennessee biology teacher John Scopes, facing off with Chicago lawyer Clarence Darrow.

Date
1909
Subjects
Politics
Religion
People
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925
Heartland Community Church, Decatur, Illinois

The Heartland Community Church in Decatur, Illinois, is across the street from a mill belonging to the Archer Daniels Midland Company, a major agricultural processing company.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Industry
Religion
Places
Decatur, Illinois
Tens-Kwau-Ta-Waw, the Prophet

Tenskwatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, led a major religious movement among Indians in the Midwest between 1805 and 1813. His brother Tecumseh led a parallel political effort to unify Indians in resistance to the encroachment of white settlement.

Creator
Inman, Henry, 1801-1846
King, Charles Bird, 1785-1862
Date
1848
Subjects
Indians of North America
Religion
Nauvoe, Illinois

Mormons fleeing persecution in New York State and then Missouri settled in Nauvoo after 1832, building it up to one of the largest cities in Illinois by the mid-1840s. In 1846 other Illinois residents expelled the Mormons, who headed west for Utah. The Mormon temple on the hill in the distance burned down in 1848. Artist Henry Lewis sketched and painted scenes along the Mississippi River between 1846 and 1848. He compiled them into a great panoramic painting of the river that was a popular attraction in the U.S. and Europe. Later he settled in Germany where he published an illustrated account of his travels.

Creator
Lewis, Henry, 1819-1904
Date
1857
Subjects
Mormons
Religion
Theater
Places
Illinois
Mississippi River Valley
Prairie Church Parade of General Middleton's Command

This image portrays the Canadian soldiers dispatched to put down the Riel Rebellion as orderly and well-disciplined. It is likely that the illustrator sought to contrast the largely Protestant Canadian troops with the Catholic rebels who were portrayed in other images as unruly drunkards and cowards. In reality the Canadian troops were ill-prepared for combat.

Date
1885
Subjects
Religion
Riel Rebellion, 1885
Photograph of Elizabeth Packard

As a result of disagreements over religion and money, Theophilus Packard committed his wife of twenty-one years, Elizabeth Ware Packard, to the Illinois insane asylum in 1860. Three years later, Elizabeth's son secured her release. Immediately upon her return to their Kankakee home, Theophilus locked her inside and prepared to move her out of the state. Through the help of friends, Elizabeth proved her sanity in court. She convinced Illinois to change its commitment process and spent the rest of her life advocating for greater protections for wives from tyrannical husbands.

Date
1866
Subjects
Gender and society
Places
Illinois
People
Packard, Elizabeth
Inside cover to _Great Disclosure of Spiritual Wickedness!!_

As a result of disagreements over religion and money, Theophilus Packard committed his wife of twenty-one years, Elizabeth Ware Packard, to the Illinois insane asylum in 1860. Three years later, Elizabeth's son secured her release. Immediately upon her return to their Kankakee home, Theophilus locked her inside and prepared to move her out of the state. Through the help of friends, Elizabeth proved her sanity in court. Abandoned by her husband, Elizabeth moved to Chicago and sold door to door this book recounting her experience. She convinced Illinois to change its commitment process and spent the rest of her life advocating for greater protections for wives from tyrannical husbands.

Creator
Packard, Elizabeth
Date
1865
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Packard, Elizabeth