26 results for “Ranch life”

The Codfish and the Cattle Princess

The caption reads: “He didn't know any girls at home who dressed like men and could talk to a fellow in this frank and unconscious fashion.”

Creator
Ryerson, Florence
Date
1918
Subjects
Cowboys
Gender and society
Ranch life
Places
West (U.S.)
Cover of _Western Life and How I Became a Bronco Buster_

The book details the author's experiences as he traveled from Liverpool, England, to California to become a bronco buster.

Creator
Quickfall, Bob Grantham
Date
1891
Subjects
Cowboys
Ranch life
Places
West (U.S.)
Children walking on railroad tracks near Knoxville, Illinois

In 1948 the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad hired two photographers to document work at the company and life in the communities it served. A series of pictures featured life on the Rader family farm near Knoxville, Illinois. Images like this one of the Rader children on their way to school were intended to show the wholesome relationship between families, communities, and the railroad corporation.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Children
Railroads
Places
Illinois
Representation of Life in a Cow Camp

The book from which this image is taken established Siringo's fame as the first cowboy autobiographer. In 1886, he gained employment with Pinkerton's National Detective Agency and worked all over the West as a Pinkerton detective, retiring to his ranch in 1907.

Date
1886
Subjects
Cowboys
Frontier and pioneer life
Places
Texas
Profile of Custer

The title page of Custer's memoir characterized it as “Being a Complete History of Indian Life, Warfare, and Adventure in America. Making Specially Prominent the Late Indian War, with Full Descriptions of The Messiah Craze, Ghost Dance, Life of Sitting Bull. The Whole Forms an Authentic and Complete History of the Savage Races in America-their Illustrious Leaders, Their Beliefs, Manners, and Customs, comprising Terrible Battles, Wonderful Escapes, Thrilling Tales of Heroism, Daring Exploits, Wonderful Fortitude, etc. etc.”

Date
1891
Places
Great Plains
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Portrait of Theodore Roosevelt

Future U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt is pictured here wearing buckskin and carrying a hunting rifle. After the death of his first wife in childbirth, Roosevelt moved to his ranch in the Dakota Territory where he wrote Hunting Trips of a Ranchman. The son of a wealthy New York businessman, Roosevelt chose to have himself portrayed as a rugged frontiersman.

Creator
Frost, A. B.
Date
1885
Subjects
Political leaders
Places
Dakota Territory
Great Plains
People
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Heroism of a Pioneer Woman

A tableau of frontier violence. This image accompanied the tale of a 1791 attack on the John Merrill home in Kentucky in which Mrs. Merrill killed five attackers with her ax. Along with stories of white settlers taken captive by American Indians, images like this portrayed settlers as victims of Indian aggression and celebrated the strength of settler women as a sign of the strength of the young American nation.

Date
1860
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Gender and society
Indians of North America
Violence
Places
Mississippi River Valley
West (U.S.)
Buffalo Bill's Duel With Yellow Hand

Buffalo Bill interrupted his stage career in 1876 to become an army scout. He took the scalp of a Cheyenne warrior, Yellow Hair, whose name was mistranslated as Yellow Hand. Cody incorporated this story into his performances when he returned to the stage, and displayed Yellow Hand's scalp as a mark of authenticity.

Date
1881
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Cheyenne Indians
Frontier and pioneer life
Places
Great Plains
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Yellow Hand, 1850?-1876
UPI Press wire demonstration at the _Chicago Sun-Times_ regarding editorial "Now that the March is Over," August 29, 1963

While returning to Chicago by train from the 1963 March on Washington, some civil rights activists read a Sun-Times editorial critical of Martin Luther King, Jr., and other leaders. As this newswire transcript recounts, some 300 activists marched directly from the train station to the Sun-Times building to picket. The newspaper's editors agreed to meet with leaders of the protest.

Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Washington D.C.
People
Black, Timuel
Seven Days of the Life of a Soldier

Manuscript account by Major Alexander Thompson of a canoe journey from Green Bay to Mackinac Island, between June 1 and June 23, 1831. Accompanied by William Holiday, proprietor of an American Fur Company trading house in the interior, who was returning to headquarters in Mackinac to settle his accounts, and by eight French voyageurs or “pork-eaters,” Thompson left Green Bay on June 1, 1831 in a 30-foot bark canoe owned by the Company. As the travelers made their way around the Bay, he commented on the forests, wildlife, and the customs and legends of the Menomonee, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Winnebago Indians. Weather-bound by strong winds to their camp near Vermilion Island, Thompson hiked along some Indian trails, observing the abundant wild strawberries, roses, peas, grapes, currants, and gooseberries, and moccasin flowers, as well as bear, deer, bald eagle, and sturgeon. Strong winds were a constant hindrance throughout the trip, but finally, at Louse Island, they entered Lake Michigan, paddling at night in the moonlight to take advantage of the calm waters. They arrived at Mackinac Island on June 23rd, and were greeted by Company official Robert Stuart.

Creator
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Date
1831
Subjects
American Fur Company
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
Green Bay (Wis.)
Mackinac Island (Mich.)
People
Holiday, William
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837