26 results for “Ranch life”

An American Log-House

In 1796 Georges-Henri-Victor Collot conducted a reconnaissance mission for France in parts of the Ohio, Missouri, and Mississippi River Valleys. The notes, maps, and drawings of his expedition were published thirty years later.

Creator
Collot, Georges-Henri-Victor, 1750-1805
Tardieu l'aine
Date
1826
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Log cabins
A White trapper

Theodore Dodge described the “white trapper” as a romantic historical type in terms similar to Frederick Jackson Turner's story of the frontier: “the first man who discovered the immense extent to which the peltry traffic could be carried was a rover of broad views, who most likely hailed from Kentucky or Missouri, was of French or Scotch-Irish descent, and perchance came from the Alleghenies in the footsteps of Daniel Boone, intent on adventure or flying from civilization.”

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Fur trade
Horsemanship
Across the Continent

Frances Palmer, who migrated from her native England to the United States in 1842 at the age of 30, was an artist who created some of the most popular lithographs sold by the Currier and Ives partnership.

Creator
Currier, Charles, 1818-1887
Ives, James Merritt, d. 1895.
Date
1868
Subjects
Empire
Frontier and pioneer life
Transportation
Visions of history
William Jennings Bryan

Born in Illinois, William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) made his political career in Nebraska. Known as the Great Commoner, he ran unsuccessfully as a Democrat for U.S. President three times. As the leader of the Democratic Party between 1896 and 1912 he forged alliances with agrarian Populists and the labor movement. As Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson he resigned to protest what he considered the President's lack of neutrality toward the war in Europe. Later in life Bryan became a vocal critic of the theory of evolution, and an ally of the emerging Christian fundamentalist movement. In 1925 he assisted with the prosecution of Tennessee biology teacher John Scopes, facing off with Chicago lawyer Clarence Darrow.

Date
1909
Subjects
Politics
Religion
People
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925
The March of Destiny

The scene depicts “Pioneer Heroes” in a caravan heading westward. An inset in the upper left portrays migrants crossing the Appalachian mountains in Kentucky, while an inset in the bottom right corner dramatizes the search for gold in California.

Date
1883
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Gold Rush
Indians of North America
Visions of history
Places
California
Kentucky
Memorandum regarding the Till murder trial, September 13, 1955, _Chicago Sun-Times_.

While visiting his relatives in Mississippi during the summer of 1955, fourteen-year old Chicagoan Emmett Till was lynched for allegedly whistling at a white woman. Till's mother insisted on bringing her son's body back to Chicago and having an open casket funeral. Thousands of black Chicagoans came to bear witness to his brutal killing, and Jet magazine published dramatic images of Till's battered body. The state of Mississippi brought charges of murder against two white men, and an all-white jury quickly found them not guilty. The Department of Justice has recently re-opened an investigation into the case.

Date
1955
Subjects
African American Life
Civil rights
Journalism
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Southern States
People
Till, Emmitt
Don't Shop Downtown Until Willis Goes

Chicago activists distributed the “Stop! Don't Shop Downtown” flyer during a campaign to oust Chicago Public Schools superintendent Benjamin Willis. Activists charged Willis with supporting segregated and inadequately funded schools for African Americans. In 1965, over 100,000 Chicago Public School students joined a two-day school boycott to protest the renewal of Willis's contract by the Chicago Board of Education.

Creator
Students Nonviolent Coordinating Committee
Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Boycotts
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Inside cover to _Great Disclosure of Spiritual Wickedness!!_

As a result of disagreements over religion and money, Theophilus Packard committed his wife of twenty-one years, Elizabeth Ware Packard, to the Illinois insane asylum in 1860. Three years later, Elizabeth's son secured her release. Immediately upon her return to their Kankakee home, Theophilus locked her inside and prepared to move her out of the state. Through the help of friends, Elizabeth proved her sanity in court. Abandoned by her husband, Elizabeth moved to Chicago and sold door to door this book recounting her experience. She convinced Illinois to change its commitment process and spent the rest of her life advocating for greater protections for wives from tyrannical husbands.

Creator
Packard, Elizabeth
Date
1865
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Packard, Elizabeth
Step High, Stoop Low, Leave Your Dignity Outside: Entrance to the Dill Pickle Club, 18 Tooker Alley

Among Chicago's most unusual contributions to the culture of modern urban life was the Dill Pickle Club, located at 18 Tooker Alley just east of Bughouse Square. Operating as a coffeehouse, art gallery, and speakeasy, “The Pickle” welcomed hoboes, prostitutes, professors, and every variety of nonconformist passing through Chicago. The club hosted weekend jazz dance parties and little theater productions of Strindberg, Ibsen, O'Neill, and local playwrights. It hosted serious lectures by university professors and spoof debates staged for pure entertainment. In its early years, the Pickle was a meeting place for some of Chicago's most famous authors, intellectuals, and radicals, including Carl Sandburg, Sherwood Anderson, Floyd Dell, Clarence Darrow, Ben Reitman, Lucy Parsons, Ralph Chaplin, Ben Hecht, Harriet Monroe, and Vachel Lindsay.

Date
ca. 1920-1930
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Dill Pickle Lending Library

Among Chicago's most unusual contributions to the culture of modern urban life was the Dill Pickle Club, located at 18 Tooker Alley just east of Bughouse Square. Operating as a coffeehouse, art gallery, and speakeasy, 'The Pickle' welcomed hoboes, prostitutes, professors, and every variety of nonconformist passing through Chicago. The club hosted weekend jazz dance parties and little theater productions of Strindberg, Ibsen, O'Neill, and local playwrights. It hosted serious lectures by university professors and spoof debates staged for pure entertainment. In its early years, the Pickle was a meeting place for some of Chicago's most famous authors, intellectuals, and radicals, including Carl Sandburg, Sherwood Anderson, Floyd Dell, Clarence Darrow, Ben Reitman, Lucy Parsons, Ralph Chaplin, Ben Hecht, Harriet Monroe, and Vachel Lindsay.

Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Places
Chicago (Ill.)