125 results for “Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)”

Report from M. Butler to E.M. Graham, May 11, 1937

The report of an undercover agent to the Pullman Company. Since the late 19th century, the Pullman Company employed African Americans as service workers on its sleeping cars. By the 1920s it was one of the largest industrial employers of African American workers, enjoying a reputation for paternalism. Beginning in the mid-1920s the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) under the leadership of A. Philip Randolph sought to unionize the porters and maids of the Pullman Company. Like other industrial employers, Pullman maintained an extensive network of informants who infiltrated unions and reported back to management.

Date
May 11, 1937
Subjects
African Americans
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Unions
Working class
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
E.F. Garry to Mr. Lane on Pullman Saving Plan

In the 1920s a growing number of large industrial employers developed welfare, recreation, and representation programs for their employees. This letter, between executives of the Pullman Company, explores the possibility of a company organized savings and investment plan for workers who built, repaired, and serviced railroad cars. Written shortly after the 1922 nationwide strike of railroad shop workers, the letter offers clues as to why employers favored such welfare programs.

Date
1922
Subjects
Industry
Labor
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Main Gate to Works, Pullman

Workers leave the Pullman Palace Car Works, 1893. This picture appeared in a promotional booklet celebrating the paternalistic labor policies of George Pullman. A year later Pullman's workers were at the center of a national strike of rail workers that failed after federal troops intervened.

Date
1893
Subjects
Industry
Pullman Company
Railroads
Working class
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Scene of Destruction and Pillage in the Panhandle Yards

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
July 8, 1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
The Riot at Forty-Ninth Street, 1894

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Labor rally poster, Du Sable High School

Unionization will advance the cause of all African Americans. So said Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) leader A. Philip Randolph at Du Sable High School in 1937, according to the Pullman Company informant who attended the meeting. Chicago's Pullman Company was a major employer of African Americans and enjoyed a reputation for paternalism toward its workers, providing good wages and an Employee Representation Plan that the company promoted as an alternative to independent unions. Beginning in the mid-1920s the BSCP worked to unionize the porters and maids working in Pullman's sleeping cars. Like other Chicago companies, Pullman maintained an extensive network of informants who infiltrated unions and reported back to management (see image #121).

Date
May 9, 1937
Subjects
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Labor unions
Pullman Company
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Randolph, A. Phillip
Farm residences in St. Clair County, Illinois

Representations of the farms of Ernst Dressel and Otto Schott, both in St. Clair County, Illinois, near East St. Louis, suggest subtle variations in the ways in which farmers sought to be represented to their neighbors and to history.

Date
1892
Places
Illinois
Saint Clair County (Ill.)
UPI Press wire demonstration at the _Chicago Sun-Times_ regarding editorial "Now that the March is Over," August 29, 1963

While returning to Chicago by train from the 1963 March on Washington, some civil rights activists read a Sun-Times editorial critical of Martin Luther King, Jr., and other leaders. As this newswire transcript recounts, some 300 activists marched directly from the train station to the Sun-Times building to picket. The newspaper's editors agreed to meet with leaders of the protest.

Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Washington D.C.
People
Black, Timuel
College of Complexes curriculum, June 1963

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum, as these issues of the College's newsletter, The Curriculum, suggest.

Date
June 1963
Subjects
Amusements
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago Magazine, The West As It Is

This magazine cover shows an American Indian watching a locomotive pulling into Chicago as the sun rises over Lake Michigan.

Date
1857
Subjects
Visions of history
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
West (U.S.)