10 results for “Missouri”

For Pike's Peak Ho!

As this advertisement explains, the trip from western Missouri to Denver took more than six days by stagecoach in the 1860s. The advent of rail travel would greatly speed transcontinental travel in the late 19th century.

Creator
Central Overland, California and Pike's Peak Express Co.
Date
[1860]
Subjects
Postal service
Transportation
Places
California
Colorado
Missouri
Writers Mobilize Against Fascism

In this editorial from the Anvil, a group of midwestern working class writers survey the economic and political scene of the Great Depression. Many writers and artists joined a loose coalition known as the Popular Front that aimed to stem the growth of conservative influence in the U.S. Here Jack Conroy and his co-editors write in support of the first American Writers Congress held in New York City in 1935.

Creator
Jack Conroy, Walter Snow, Clinton Simpson, J.S. Balch, Will Wharton, Jean Winkler
Date
1935
Subjects
Literature
Places
Moberly, Missouri
New York
Child of the Dead and Forgotten Gods

Born on a Mississippi plantation in 1908, Richard Wright moved to Chicago in 1927. While working in the Post Office he joined the Communist Party's cultural organization, the John Reed Club in order to develop his writing. In 1934, he published two poems in Jack Conroy's literary journal Anvil—not his first publication as Conroy typed at the top of this page, but his first in a magazine that claimed national circulation. Wright went on to write the best-selling novels Native Son and Black Boy. He left the Communist Party in the 1940s, and lived in France until his death in 1960.

Creator
Wright, Richard
Date
1934
Subjects
Communism
Literature
Working class
Types and Development of Man

An illustration from the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, conveys the racialist thinking common at the time.

Creator
Buel, James W., 1849-1920
Date
1904
Subjects
World's Fair, St. Louis, 1904
An American Log-House

In 1796 Georges-Henri-Victor Collot conducted a reconnaissance mission for France in parts of the Ohio, Missouri, and Mississippi River Valleys. The notes, maps, and drawings of his expedition were published thirty years later.

Creator
Collot, Georges-Henri-Victor, 1750-1805
Tardieu l'aine
Date
1826
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Log cabins
Sharecropper, cover of _New Anvil,_ May-June 1940

Jack Conroy, a worker and proletarian writer born in a coal mining camp in Missouri, moved to Chicago in 1938, where he worked on the Illinois Writers Project and edited the New Anvil, a small literary magazine, with Nelson Algren.

Creator
de Graff, Stanley
Date
1940
Subjects
Literature
Working class
People
Conroy, Jack
A White trapper

Theodore Dodge described the “white trapper” as a romantic historical type in terms similar to Frederick Jackson Turner's story of the frontier: “the first man who discovered the immense extent to which the peltry traffic could be carried was a rover of broad views, who most likely hailed from Kentucky or Missouri, was of French or Scotch-Irish descent, and perchance came from the Alleghenies in the footsteps of Daniel Boone, intent on adventure or flying from civilization.”

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Fur trade
Horsemanship
Gilpin's Hydrographic Map of North America

William Gilpin moved west from Philadelphia in the 1830s, and became an indefatigable promoter of the West as a lecturer, writer, and as editor of the Missouri Daily Argus. He saw America as destined to become the center of the next great phase of civilization, and saw the Mississippi Valley as the heart of that civilization. Gilpin's 1848 hydrographic map enlarged the Mississippi basin and pushed the Rocky Mountains west of their actual position. In 1861 he became the first governor of the Colorado Territory.

Creator
Gilpin, William, 1813-1894
Date
1848
Nauvoe, Illinois

Mormons fleeing persecution in New York State and then Missouri settled in Nauvoo after 1832, building it up to one of the largest cities in Illinois by the mid-1840s. In 1846 other Illinois residents expelled the Mormons, who headed west for Utah. The Mormon temple on the hill in the distance burned down in 1848. Artist Henry Lewis sketched and painted scenes along the Mississippi River between 1846 and 1848. He compiled them into a great panoramic painting of the river that was a popular attraction in the U.S. and Europe. Later he settled in Germany where he published an illustrated account of his travels.

Creator
Lewis, Henry, 1819-1904
Date
1857
Subjects
Mormons
Religion
Theater
Places
Illinois
Mississippi River Valley
Portrait of Henry Belland, "the Voyageur"

Frank Blackwell Mayer was a Baltimore artist who traveled independently in 1851 to Minnesota to observe and sketch the Sioux Indians present at treaty negotiations at Traverse des Sioux and Mendota. In May of 1851 Mayer left Maryland and journeyed via the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Missouri, St. Paul, and Fort Snelling. After visiting Kaposia he accompanied the treaty commissioners to Traverse des Sioux, arriving June 30. Mayer returned to Baltimore by October, having recorded impressions of his travels in a series of sketchbooks and a diary.

Creator
Mayer, Frank Blackwell, 1827-1899
Date
1851
Subjects
Fur trade
Places
Minnesota
People
Mayer, Frank Blackwell, 1827-1899