23 results for “McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949”

A New Map of the United States of North America


Creator
Cary, John, 1754-1835.
Date
1805
Places
Great Lakes Region
North America
An Improved Edition of a Map of the Surveyed Part of the Territory of Michigan

John Farmer became the premier cartographer of Michigan in the early nineteenth century, publishing his first map of the state in 1826. In this map that Farmer published in English in 1835, he neglects Indian villages, unlike the 1834 version published in German, and also shows that an increasing part of the state has been covered by the rectangular land survey.

Creator
Farmer, John, 1798-1859
Date
1835?
Subjects
Mapping
Places
Mackinac Island (Mich.)
Michigan
Boy separating cream at the Rader Farm, Knoxville, Illinois

Children of farm families were expected to help out with farm work from a young age. Here one of the sons of the farmer Scott Rader uses a machine to separate cream from raw milk. Behind him sits a Maytag clothes washing machine. As more farm homes gained access to electricity over the mid-twentieth century, domestic machinery transformed the work of maintaining a farm household.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Children
Dairy farmers
Farming
Places
Illinois
Chief American Horse, Northern Cheyenne

Oil on canvas. Signed “E.A. Burbank, Lame Deer, Mont., 1897.”

Creator
Burbank, E. A. (Elbridge Ayer), 1858-1949
Date
1897
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Places
Montana
People
American Horse, Dakota Chief, 1840-1908
Child of the Dead and Forgotten Gods

Born on a Mississippi plantation in 1908, Richard Wright moved to Chicago in 1927. While working in the Post Office he joined the Communist Party's cultural organization, the John Reed Club in order to develop his writing. In 1934, he published two poems in Jack Conroy's literary journal Anvil—not his first publication as Conroy typed at the top of this page, but his first in a magazine that claimed national circulation. Wright went on to write the best-selling novels Native Son and Black Boy. He left the Communist Party in the 1940s, and lived in France until his death in 1960.

Creator
Wright, Richard
Date
1934
Subjects
Communism
Literature
Working class
Children walking on railroad tracks near Knoxville, Illinois

In 1948 the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad hired two photographers to document work at the company and life in the communities it served. A series of pictures featured life on the Rader family farm near Knoxville, Illinois. Images like this one of the Rader children on their way to school were intended to show the wholesome relationship between families, communities, and the railroad corporation.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Children
Railroads
Places
Illinois
Cleaning the "Vistadome" Car

Railroad work in the U.S. was segregated by race well into the 1950s. African Americans held jobs for car cleaners, maids, and porters, but rarely worked as conductors or engineers. Here an African American woman cleans the interior of the Chicago, Burlington, & Quincy “Vistadome” car.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Labor
Railroads
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Cleaning the Vista Dome Car

A worker empties trash from a rail road dining car, 1949. Two workers are visible inside the car. Most railroad work was racially segregated into the 1950s with African Americans largely restricted to service jobs such as porters, cooks, and cleaners.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Labor
Railroads
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Farm woman gathering eggs

Although tending poultry was considered “women's work” on midwestern farms, it was a profitable enterprise that brought in much needed cash for farm families.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Agriculture
Farming
Gender and society
Places
Illinois
Farmer planting corn near Creston, Iowa

Although many had switched to motorized tractors by the late 1940s, this farmer in southwestern Iowa was still using horses.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Agriculture
Farming
Places
Iowa