23 results for “McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949”

The Liberty Bond Mutual Benefit Association-The Money is Mostly Spent at Home

The U.S. entered Europe's Great War in 1917 as a deeply divided nation. To rally the country to the cause of war, the federal government launched a massive public relations effort drawing on the most talented communicators in business, journalism, and government. In this advertisement from the Chicago Tribune of October 1917, popular cartoonist John T. McCutcheon encourages Americans to support the war effort by purchasing government bonds. With the letters US in the background, a circle of men representing different occupations is united by Liberty Bonds. The poster suggests that only un-American outsiders would refuse to support the bond drive.

Creator
McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949
Date
1917
Subjects
World War I
Speech of John Hossack on the Fugitive Slave Law

The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 required the federal government to assist with retrieving runaway slaves even in free states like Illinois. In an act of civil disobedience, businessman John Hossack and seven others helped a runaway slave named Jim Grey escape from federal custody just as he was about to be sent back South. Convicted in a Chicago court, Hossack paid a $100 fine and spent ten days in jail, although he was released each day to dine with Chicago officials and prominent citizens. In his strongly worded defense, Hossack argued, “the parties who prostituted the constitution to the support of slavery, are traitors.”

Creator
Hossack, John
Date
1860
Subjects
Law
Slavery
Child of the Dead and Forgotten Gods

Born on a Mississippi plantation in 1908, Richard Wright moved to Chicago in 1927. While working in the Post Office he joined the Communist Party's cultural organization, the John Reed Club in order to develop his writing. In 1934, he published two poems in Jack Conroy's literary journal Anvil—not his first publication as Conroy typed at the top of this page, but his first in a magazine that claimed national circulation. Wright went on to write the best-selling novels Native Son and Black Boy. He left the Communist Party in the 1940s, and lived in France until his death in 1960.

Creator
Wright, Richard
Date
1934
Subjects
Communism
Literature
Working class
William Jennings Bryan

Born in Illinois, William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) made his political career in Nebraska. Known as the Great Commoner, he ran unsuccessfully as a Democrat for U.S. President three times. As the leader of the Democratic Party between 1896 and 1912 he forged alliances with agrarian Populists and the labor movement. As Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson he resigned to protest what he considered the President's lack of neutrality toward the war in Europe. Later in life Bryan became a vocal critic of the theory of evolution, and an ally of the emerging Christian fundamentalist movement. In 1925 he assisted with the prosecution of Tennessee biology teacher John Scopes, facing off with Chicago lawyer Clarence Darrow.

Date
1909
Subjects
Politics
Religion
People
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925
Cleaning the Vista Dome Car

A worker empties trash from a rail road dining car, 1949. Two workers are visible inside the car. Most railroad work was racially segregated into the 1950s with African Americans largely restricted to service jobs such as porters, cooks, and cleaners.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Labor
Railroads
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Cleaning the "Vistadome" Car

Railroad work in the U.S. was segregated by race well into the 1950s. African Americans held jobs for car cleaners, maids, and porters, but rarely worked as conductors or engineers. Here an African American woman cleans the interior of the Chicago, Burlington, & Quincy “Vistadome” car.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Labor
Railroads
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
A New Map of the United States of North America


Creator
Cary, John, 1754-1835.
Date
1805
Places
Great Lakes Region
North America
There Ought to Be School for the Instruction of Women Voters

This cartoon appeared in the Chicago Tribune five days after the Illinois House of Representatives approved women's suffrage in Illinois.

Creator
McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949
Date
1913
Subjects
Education
Gender and society
Suffrage
Places
Illinois
Boy separating cream at the Rader Farm, Knoxville, Illinois

Children of farm families were expected to help out with farm work from a young age. Here one of the sons of the farmer Scott Rader uses a machine to separate cream from raw milk. Behind him sits a Maytag clothes washing machine. As more farm homes gained access to electricity over the mid-twentieth century, domestic machinery transformed the work of maintaining a farm household.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Children
Dairy farmers
Farming
Places
Illinois
Milking time at the Rader farm, Knoxville, Illinois

Leroy Rader milks a cow on his family farm near Knoxville, Illinois, 1948. Even in the 20th century, children's work was an important part of successful farming.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Agriculture
Children
Dairy farmers
Farming
Places
Illinois