9 results for “Man Ray”

Capitalism, Humanity, Government

Chicago's anarchist community participated in a national and international debate about the nature of state power in modern society. This cover of Emma Goldman's Mother Earth magazine, drawn by the Dada artist Man Ray, depicts humanity torn apart by capitalism and government, each a different manifestation of the same monstrous reality. Although published in New York City, Mother Earth reported regularly on the activities of Chicago anarchists, and Goldman spent a good deal of time in the city.

Creator
Man Ray
Date
August 1914
People
Goldman, Emma
Types and Development of Man

An illustration from the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, conveys the racialist thinking common at the time.

Creator
Buel, James W., 1849-1920
Date
1904
Subjects
World's Fair, St. Louis, 1904
Will Amazonic Women Usurp Man's Sphere?

An advertisement for a lecture at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club, printed on the reverse of an advertisement for a lecture by Magnus Hirschfeld. Little is known about the speaker, Elizabeth Davis, who appears to have been part of the bohemian community on Chicago's north side.

Creator
Dill Pickle Club
Date
1931
Subjects
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
homosexuality
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish), "Custer as a White Man"

Painting on paper by the Native American artist Red Fish. The hand written caption, believed to be by Aaron McGaffey Beede who commissioned the work, reads “Custer as a white man/made by Red Fish/Indians believe Custer/has the “tonj” of an Indian.” The word “tonj” was usually translated as “spirit” in the 19th century, suggesting that Native Americans respected Custer as a fallen warrior. Another image by Red Fish (image #50) shows “Custer as a Comanche.”

Creator
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish)
Date
n.d.
Subjects
Art
Indians of North America
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Indian shooting fish

A Native American man crouches at the bank of a river. He holds a bow and arrow and aims at the water.

Creator
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Date
1853
Subjects
Fishing
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish), "Custer as a Comanche"

Undated painting on cardboard with an annotation, “Custer as a Comanche.” A similar painting (image #202) depicts “Custer as a White Man.”

Creator
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish)
Date
n.d.
Subjects
Art
Indians of North America
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
A White trapper

Theodore Dodge described the “white trapper” as a romantic historical type in terms similar to Frederick Jackson Turner's story of the frontier: “the first man who discovered the immense extent to which the peltry traffic could be carried was a rover of broad views, who most likely hailed from Kentucky or Missouri, was of French or Scotch-Irish descent, and perchance came from the Alleghenies in the footsteps of Daniel Boone, intent on adventure or flying from civilization.”

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Fur trade
Horsemanship
Canadiska Västern: den Sista Bästa Västern

A young man wipes his brow as if resting from hard work. In the background, symbols of agriculture and industry stretch out toward a distant mountain range. During the early 20th century, the government of Canada advertised in many countries of Europe hoping to recruit settlers to farm the prairie provinces, and work in its growing industries. The recruitment campaign helped to bring over 1.5 million immigrants to Canada during the first decade of the century.

Creator
Canada. Department of Interior.
Date
1910
Subjects
Agriculture
Immigration
Places
Canada
Ukrainian-Canadian Festival, Saskatoon

A man and woman in traditional dress dance atop a map of Canada. As part of its plan to populate the western provinces the Canadian government encouraged immigration from many European countries. Before World War I cut off trans-Atlantic migration, more than 150,000 Ukrainians had settled in Canada, many of them in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Thousands more arrived in the 1920s. Non-British immigrants often experienced discrimination at the hands of native-born Canadians, and were encouraged to abandon their language and traditional clothes. During World War I, thousands of Ukrainians were imprisoned because they were originally from Canada’s enemy, the Austrian Empire. By the late 1940s, some of the prejudice had tempered as immigrants and their children claimed the right to be Canadians and immigrants.

Creator
Association of Ukrainian Canadians
Date
July 31, 1946
Subjects
Dancers
Immigration
Places
Saskatchewan