12 results for “June 1963”

College of Complexes curriculum, June 1963

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum, as these issues of the College's newsletter, The Curriculum, suggest.

Date
June 1963
Subjects
Amusements
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
UPI Press wire demonstration at the _Chicago Sun-Times_ regarding editorial "Now that the March is Over," August 29, 1963

While returning to Chicago by train from the 1963 March on Washington, some civil rights activists read a Sun-Times editorial critical of Martin Luther King, Jr., and other leaders. As this newswire transcript recounts, some 300 activists marched directly from the train station to the Sun-Times building to picket. The newspaper's editors agreed to meet with leaders of the protest.

Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Washington D.C.
People
Black, Timuel
Don't Shop Downtown Until Willis Goes

Chicago activists distributed the “Stop! Don't Shop Downtown” flyer during a campaign to oust Chicago Public Schools superintendent Benjamin Willis. Activists charged Willis with supporting segregated and inadequately funded schools for African Americans. In 1965, over 100,000 Chicago Public School students joined a two-day school boycott to protest the renewal of Willis's contract by the Chicago Board of Education.

Creator
Students Nonviolent Coordinating Committee
Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Boycotts
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Seven Days of the Life of a Soldier

Manuscript account by Major Alexander Thompson of a canoe journey from Green Bay to Mackinac Island, between June 1 and June 23, 1831. Accompanied by William Holiday, proprietor of an American Fur Company trading house in the interior, who was returning to headquarters in Mackinac to settle his accounts, and by eight French voyageurs or “pork-eaters,” Thompson left Green Bay on June 1, 1831 in a 30-foot bark canoe owned by the Company. As the travelers made their way around the Bay, he commented on the forests, wildlife, and the customs and legends of the Menomonee, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Winnebago Indians. Weather-bound by strong winds to their camp near Vermilion Island, Thompson hiked along some Indian trails, observing the abundant wild strawberries, roses, peas, grapes, currants, and gooseberries, and moccasin flowers, as well as bear, deer, bald eagle, and sturgeon. Strong winds were a constant hindrance throughout the trip, but finally, at Louse Island, they entered Lake Michigan, paddling at night in the moonlight to take advantage of the calm waters. They arrived at Mackinac Island on June 23rd, and were greeted by Company official Robert Stuart.

Creator
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Date
1831
Subjects
American Fur Company
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
Green Bay (Wis.)
Mackinac Island (Mich.)
People
Holiday, William
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Sherwood Anderson, "Jack Jones--The Pickler."

In this article from the Chicago Daily News, the novelist Sherwood Anderson describes the diverse audience at the Dill Pickle Club: “The street car conductor sits on a bench beside the college professor, the literary critic, the earnest young wife, who hungers for culture, and the hobo.”

Creator
Sherwood Anderson
Date
1919
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Literature
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Writers Mobilize Against Fascism

In this editorial from the Anvil, a group of midwestern working class writers survey the economic and political scene of the Great Depression. Many writers and artists joined a loose coalition known as the Popular Front that aimed to stem the growth of conservative influence in the U.S. Here Jack Conroy and his co-editors write in support of the first American Writers Congress held in New York City in 1935.

Creator
Jack Conroy, Walter Snow, Clinton Simpson, J.S. Balch, Will Wharton, Jean Winkler
Date
1935
Subjects
Literature
Places
Moberly, Missouri
New York
Sharecropper, cover of _New Anvil,_ May-June 1940

Jack Conroy, a worker and proletarian writer born in a coal mining camp in Missouri, moved to Chicago in 1938, where he worked on the Illinois Writers Project and edited the New Anvil, a small literary magazine, with Nelson Algren.

Creator
de Graff, Stanley
Date
1940
Subjects
Literature
Working class
People
Conroy, Jack
There Ought to Be School for the Instruction of Women Voters

This cartoon appeared in the Chicago Tribune five days after the Illinois House of Representatives approved women's suffrage in Illinois.

Creator
McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949
Date
1913
Subjects
Education
Gender and society
Suffrage
Places
Illinois
Color satellite photo of the Great Lakes

In satellite imagery, the Great Lakes dominate the landscape of central North America, uninterrupted by the political boundaries between the U.S. and Canada, or between states and provinces.

Creator
Leshkevich, G.
Date
1995
Subjects
Great Lakes Region
Mapping
Places
Great Lakes
Front cover of program for Buffalo Bill and Captain Jack in _Life on the Border_

A playbill from the five act play entitled, Life on The Border performed at the Dietz Opera House in Oakland, California, on Wednesday, June 13, 1877. Buffalo Bill Cody and Captain Jack Crawford played themselves, dramatizing their western experiences.

Date
1877
Subjects
Theater
Places
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Crawford, Jack, 1847-1917