9 results for “January 19, 1867”

The Massacre of United States Troops by the Sioux and Cheyenne Indians Near Fort Philip Kearney, Dakotah Territory, December 22nd, 1866

In 1866 U. S. soldiers sought to defend three recently built forts protecting the Bozeman Trail leading to the gold fields of Montana. Lieutenant Colonel W. J. Fetterman led eighty men against the Sioux, expecting an easy victory, and he and all his soldiers were killed. A peace treaty was concluded in 1868.

Date
January 19, 1867
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Indians of North America
Sioux
Places
Dakota Territory
Joe Hill's Funeral

In November 1915, thousands attended the Chicago funeral of songwriter Joe Hill, who was executed by firing squad in a Utah prison. According to his supporters in the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), Hill was falsely convicted of murder. The Swedish immigrant was best known for songs such as The Rebel Girl and The Preacher and the Slave, which gave new political lyrics to popular or traditional tunes.

Date
January 1916
Subjects
Immigration
Industrial Workers of the World
Labor unions
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Hill, Joe
Terrorism

In coordinated raids organized by Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer across the nation during January 1920, federal and local law enforcement officials arrested thousands of radicals, trade union militants, and immigrants. Officials warned that this breach of civil liberties was necessary because radicals were plotting to overthrow the government. In response, the Chicago Federation of Labor's newspaper attacked Palmer's Red Raids as employer-inspired retribution for the massive strikes that had paralyzed industry during 1919.

Creator
Chicago Federation of Labor
Date
January 10, 1920
Subjects
Civil rights
Labor
Margaret Sanger's Chicago speaking engagements, 1916

In 1913 and 1914 New Yorker Margaret Sanger published several articles on birth control, venereal disease, and women's rights that resulted in federal obscenity charges against her. When the charges were dropped in 1916 Sanger toured the country giving lectures promoting birth control. Chicagoan Margaret C. Anderson, editor of The Little Review, was an ardent supporter of birth control, and used her magazine to promote Sanger's lectures.

Date
1916
Subjects
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago's Interracial Debating Classic, January 25, 1931

Before the advent of television, lectures and debates provided public entertainment. Social activists used these venues to present their ideas and to educate their constituencies. This flyer promotes a debate involving A. Philip Randolph and Chandler Owen, both leaders of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP), as optimists, and Ben Reitman and David Tullman, both white radicals associated with the Dill Pickle Club, as pessimists. Although the exact topic of the debate is unclear, both sides supported unionization as well as racial integration. In 1931, the BSCP was engaged in a campaign to gain formal recognition as the union of African American porters and maids who worked on Pullman sleeping cars.

Date
1931
Subjects
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Dill Pickle Club
Education
Labor
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Randolph, A. Phillip
Reitman, Ben
I Await the Devil's Coming

Nineteen-year-old Mary MacLane from Butte, Montana, may have been the original flapper. She wrote “I Await the Devil's Coming” and sent it to Chicago's Stone and Kimball Company. When it appeared in print in 1902, re-titled The Story of Mary MacLane, the book sparked controversy with its references to the author's sexual longings. Literary critics proclaimed it a work of refreshing openness, while more traditional readers thought it improper for a young woman. For a time, her name became synonymous with female sexuality. MacLane went on to write several other books and to act in early films. Never married, she lived in Chicago until her death in 1929.

Creator
MacLane, Mary
Date
1901
Subjects
Gender and society
Literature
Places
Montana
Canada Day 1988 Voyageur Cup

A group of Canadians, some dressed as Voyageurs, carry a large canoe of the type used in the fur trade. Canada Day commemorates the 1867 British North America Act that united all different British colonies into the “Dominion of Canada.”

Creator
Noel, Lynn
Date
1988
Subjects
Fur trade
Visions of history
Places
Canada
Ontario
Mittal Steel, Riverdale, Illinois

A modern steel “minimill” about 30 miles south of downtown Chicago. A U.S. flag appears prominently on one side of the mill. Situated on the Calumet River, this facility was built by Acme Steel in 1996 and is the successor to an adjacent mill built in 1918. Through a series of buyouts Acme Steel became part of Mittal Steel, a global steel producer led by Indian-born Lakshmi Mittal. In 2006 Mittal merged with the European steelmaker Arcelor to form the world's largest steelmaker.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Industry
Places
Riverdale, Illinois
Frontispiece to Clarence Darrow's _Argument in Defense of the Communists_

Among those arrested in January 1920 were twenty members of the Communist Labor Party, one of two newly formed left wing parties that emulated the revolutionary example of the Russian Bolsheviks. Charged under a wartime sedition law, the Communists faced long jail terms. In their defense, well-known civil liberties attorney Clarence Darrow argued that the government targeted the Communists for their beliefs rather than any criminal activities.

Date
1920
Subjects
Civil rights
Communism
Law
People
Darrow, Clarence