83 results for “Indians of North America”

Travelling Hunting Party

Artist Henry Lewis sketched and painted scenes along the Mississippi River between 1846 and 1848. He compiled them into a great panoramic painting of the river that was a popular attraction in the U.S. and Europe. Later he settled in Germany where he published an illustrated account of his travels.

Creator
Lewis, Henry, 1819-1904
Date
1857
Subjects
Hunting
Indians of North America
Theater
Places
Mississippi River Valley
Cheyenne camp attacked at Powder River

From a Cheyenne ledger book, probably illustrated between 1877 and 1879, containing drawings by Black Horse and other Cheyenne warriors. The Black Horse ledger book is part of a long tradition of the Plains Indians of chronicling their lives pictorially, first on buffalo hides, and later on the blank pages of ledger books obtained from U.S. soldiers, traders, missionaries, and reservation employees.

Date
ca. 1876
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Horsemanship
Indian ledger drawings
Indians of North America
Places
Great Plains
People
Black Horse (Cheyenne)
Tens-Kwau-Ta-Waw, the Prophet

Tenskwatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, led a major religious movement among Indians in the Midwest between 1805 and 1813. His brother Tecumseh led a parallel political effort to unify Indians in resistance to the encroachment of white settlement.

Creator
Inman, Henry, 1801-1846
King, Charles Bird, 1785-1862
Date
1848
Subjects
Indians of North America
Religion
Railroad building on the Great Plains

Workers lay new rails across the northern Great Plains as a group of covered wagons waits to continue its trip. Appearing in the popular magazine Harper's Weekly in 1875 this picture suggests the interest of eastern readers in the expansion of Euro-American settlement into the West.

Creator
Waud, Alfred R. (Alfred Rudolph), 1828-1891
Date
July 17, 1875
Subjects
Indians of North America
Railroads
Soldiers
Transportation
Working class
Places
Great Plains
Death of Custer

Decades after Custer's death, Pawnee Bill (Gordon W. Lillie), like Buffalo Bill, found commercial success in reenacting a stylized vision of frontier victimization.

Creator
Siegel, Cooper & Co.
Date
c. 1905
Subjects
Indians of North America
Theater
Visions of history
People
Pawnee Bill, 1860-1942
Fort Mackinac on Mackinac Island

Seth Eastman produced watercolor drawings to illustrate Henry Rowe Schoolcraft's Historical and Statistical Information Respecting the History, Condition and Prospects of the Indian Tribes of the United States (Philadelphia : Lippincott, Grambo & Company, (successors to Grigg, Elliot & Co.), 1853).

Creator
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Date
1853
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Fort Mackinac (Mackinac Island, Mich.)
People
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, 1793-1864
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish), "Custer as a White Man"

Painting on paper by the Native American artist Red Fish. The hand written caption, believed to be by Aaron McGaffey Beede who commissioned the work, reads “Custer as a white man/made by Red Fish/Indians believe Custer/has the “tonj” of an Indian.” The word “tonj” was usually translated as “spirit” in the 19th century, suggesting that Native Americans respected Custer as a fallen warrior. Another image by Red Fish (image #50) shows “Custer as a Comanche.”

Creator
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish)
Date
n.d.
Subjects
Art
Indians of North America
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Zitkala-Sa

Zitkala-Sa (1876-1938) was born Gertrude Bonnin on the Yankton Sioux reservation in Dakota Territory. As a youth she attended one of the many boarding schools designed to assimilate Native Americans into European-American culture. As an adult she became a writer, speaker and political organizer for the cause of Native American self-determination.

Date
1921
Subjects
Indians of North America
Sioux
People
Zitkala-Sa, 1876-1938
Seven Days of the Life of a Soldier

Manuscript account by Major Alexander Thompson of a canoe journey from Green Bay to Mackinac Island, between June 1 and June 23, 1831. Accompanied by William Holiday, proprietor of an American Fur Company trading house in the interior, who was returning to headquarters in Mackinac to settle his accounts, and by eight French voyageurs or “pork-eaters,” Thompson left Green Bay on June 1, 1831 in a 30-foot bark canoe owned by the Company. As the travelers made their way around the Bay, he commented on the forests, wildlife, and the customs and legends of the Menomonee, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Winnebago Indians. Weather-bound by strong winds to their camp near Vermilion Island, Thompson hiked along some Indian trails, observing the abundant wild strawberries, roses, peas, grapes, currants, and gooseberries, and moccasin flowers, as well as bear, deer, bald eagle, and sturgeon. Strong winds were a constant hindrance throughout the trip, but finally, at Louse Island, they entered Lake Michigan, paddling at night in the moonlight to take advantage of the calm waters. They arrived at Mackinac Island on June 23rd, and were greeted by Company official Robert Stuart.

Creator
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Date
1831
Subjects
American Fur Company
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
Green Bay (Wis.)
Mackinac Island (Mich.)
People
Holiday, William
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Plain Crees driving buffaloes into a pound

This illustration accompanies Henry Hind's description of how Cree Indians captured buffalo for slaughter. In the distance a circular “pound” or corral is visible.

Date
1860
Subjects
Cree Indians
Hunting
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
Manitoba