83 results for “Indians of North America”

Fort Mackinac on Mackinac Island

Seth Eastman produced watercolor drawings to illustrate Henry Rowe Schoolcraft's Historical and Statistical Information Respecting the History, Condition and Prospects of the Indian Tribes of the United States (Philadelphia : Lippincott, Grambo & Company, (successors to Grigg, Elliot & Co.), 1853).

Creator
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Date
1853
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Fort Mackinac (Mackinac Island, Mich.)
People
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, 1793-1864
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish), "Custer as a White Man"

Painting on paper by the Native American artist Red Fish. The hand written caption, believed to be by Aaron McGaffey Beede who commissioned the work, reads “Custer as a white man/made by Red Fish/Indians believe Custer/has the “tonj” of an Indian.” The word “tonj” was usually translated as “spirit” in the 19th century, suggesting that Native Americans respected Custer as a fallen warrior. Another image by Red Fish (image #50) shows “Custer as a Comanche.”

Creator
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish)
Date
n.d.
Subjects
Art
Indians of North America
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Zitkala-Sa

Zitkala-Sa (1876-1938) was born Gertrude Bonnin on the Yankton Sioux reservation in Dakota Territory. As a youth she attended one of the many boarding schools designed to assimilate Native Americans into European-American culture. As an adult she became a writer, speaker and political organizer for the cause of Native American self-determination.

Date
1921
Subjects
Indians of North America
Sioux
People
Zitkala-Sa, 1876-1938
Seven Days of the Life of a Soldier

Manuscript account by Major Alexander Thompson of a canoe journey from Green Bay to Mackinac Island, between June 1 and June 23, 1831. Accompanied by William Holiday, proprietor of an American Fur Company trading house in the interior, who was returning to headquarters in Mackinac to settle his accounts, and by eight French voyageurs or “pork-eaters,” Thompson left Green Bay on June 1, 1831 in a 30-foot bark canoe owned by the Company. As the travelers made their way around the Bay, he commented on the forests, wildlife, and the customs and legends of the Menomonee, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Winnebago Indians. Weather-bound by strong winds to their camp near Vermilion Island, Thompson hiked along some Indian trails, observing the abundant wild strawberries, roses, peas, grapes, currants, and gooseberries, and moccasin flowers, as well as bear, deer, bald eagle, and sturgeon. Strong winds were a constant hindrance throughout the trip, but finally, at Louse Island, they entered Lake Michigan, paddling at night in the moonlight to take advantage of the calm waters. They arrived at Mackinac Island on June 23rd, and were greeted by Company official Robert Stuart.

Creator
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Date
1831
Subjects
American Fur Company
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
Green Bay (Wis.)
Mackinac Island (Mich.)
People
Holiday, William
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Plain Crees driving buffaloes into a pound

This illustration accompanies Henry Hind's description of how Cree Indians captured buffalo for slaughter. In the distance a circular “pound” or corral is visible.

Date
1860
Subjects
Cree Indians
Hunting
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
Manitoba
Rain-in-the-Face

This portrait of Rain-in-the-Face appeared with an article about the Battle of Little Big Horn written by Charles Eastman. Unlike his portrait in image #52, here the former Sioux warrior chose to appear in a traditional head dress.

Creator
Eastman, Charles Alexander, 1858-1939
Date
1904
Subjects
Battle of Little Big Horn
Indians of North America
Sioux
People
Rain-in-the-Face, ca. 1835-1905
Lac Superieur et autres lieux ou sont les missions des peres de la Compagnie de Iesus, comprises sous le nom d'Outaouacs

This map of the upper Great Lakes shows several Jesuit missions as well as American Indian communities.

Creator
Dablon, Claude
Date
1673
Subjects
Indians of North America
Mapping
Religion
Places
Great Lakes
Lake Superior
Fishing Lakes, Qu' Appelle River

Henry Youle Hind, a chemistry and geology professor at Toronto's Trinity College, led an expedition that explored the Red and Assiniboine Rivers in southern Manitoba and the Qu'Appelle River in southern Saskatchewan. Hind's travel accounts, along with those of the contemporaneous Palliser expedition (1857-1860), helped promote the idea of Canada's prairies as a site for future colonization.

Creator
Hind, Henry Youle, 1823-1908
Date
1860
Subjects
Fishing
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
Manitoba
Back view of the American Fur Company buildings, Fond du Lac

Thomas McKenney accompanied Lewis Cass, the governor of the Michigan Territory, to the far west of Lake Superior during the summer of 1826 to meet with American Indian leaders and search for the source of the Mississippi River. This drawing looks south across the St. Louis River showing the post's garden and cabins and, across the river, encampments of American Indians.

Date
1827
Subjects
Agriculture
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Places
Fond du Lac (Duluth, Minn.)
Charles A. Eastman

Also known by his Dakota name Ohiyesa, Eastman grew up with his grandmother and uncle in Manitobabut became a Christian at his father's urging. He attended Knox and Dartmouth Colleges, and received a medical degree from Boston University. He married a white classmate, Elaine Goodale, and then served as a medical officer at the Pine Ridge reservation in the early 1890s.

Date
1916
Subjects
Indians of North America
Sioux