36 results for “Indian ledger drawings”

Lac Superieur et autres lieux ou sont les missions des peres de la Compagnie de Iesus, comprises sous le nom d'Outaouacs

This map of the upper Great Lakes shows several Jesuit missions as well as American Indian communities.

Creator
Dablon, Claude
Date
1673
Subjects
Indians of North America
Mapping
Religion
Places
Great Lakes
Lake Superior
Plan de Missilimakinak avec la description de la route du Missisipi

The upper right quadrant of the image details the Straits of Mackinac region, including the fort and Indian village at Saint Ignace and the fort established across the Straits at latter-day Mackinaw City; 16 lines of accompanying notes mention the presence of 600 coureurs de bois in 1716. On same sheet are maps of the Fort Chambly in Québec and Fort Frontenac (later the site of Kingston, Ontario).

Date
ca. 1717
Subjects
Empire
Indians of North America
Mapping
Places
Fort Michilimackinac (Mackinaw City, Mich.)
Carte copiée sur celle qui a été tracée par le sauvage Ochagache et autres

The map shown here was traced in a French archive in 1846 from an original map drawn in the 1730s by Auchagah (Ochagache), a Cree Indian, at the request of a French army officer stationed at a fort north of Lake Superior. Auchagah based his map on earlier maps and drawings made by other Cree Indians, as well as his own knowledge of the area.

Creator
Margry. Pierre
Date
1846, 1730s
Subjects
Cree Indians
Mapping
Schauplatz des Kriegs zwischen Engelland und seinen Collonien in America, 1776

This map of the “Arena of the War between England and her Colonies in America” was published in Frankfurt, Germany, in 1776, at the beginning of that war. The names of American Indian tribes are visible across the Great Lakes region.

Creator
Jaeger, Johann Christian
Date
1776
Subjects
Indians of North America
Revolutionary War
Places
United States
United States of America Compiled from the latest & best Authorities

Like other maps from the early years of the United States, John Melish's 1818 map claimed territory for the new nation. The odd shape of the state of Illinois suggests the mapmaker's limited knowledge of the region, perhaps due to the fact that most American settlement at the time was closer to the Ohio River. The map includes references to American Indian settlements to the west of the Mississippi River.

Creator
Melish, John, 1771-1822
Date
1818
Subjects
Mapping
Places
North America
An American Log-House

In 1796 Georges-Henri-Victor Collot conducted a reconnaissance mission for France in parts of the Ohio, Missouri, and Mississippi River Valleys. The notes, maps, and drawings of his expedition were published thirty years later.

Creator
Collot, Georges-Henri-Victor, 1750-1805
Tardieu l'aine
Date
1826
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Log cabins
Back view of the American Fur Company buildings, Fond du Lac

Thomas McKenney accompanied Lewis Cass, the governor of the Michigan Territory, to the far west of Lake Superior during the summer of 1826 to meet with American Indian leaders and search for the source of the Mississippi River. This drawing looks south across the St. Louis River showing the post's garden and cabins and, across the river, encampments of American Indians.

Date
1827
Subjects
Agriculture
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Places
Fond du Lac (Duluth, Minn.)
Front View of the American Fur Company Buildings, Fond du Lac

Thomas McKenney accompanied Lewis Cass, the governor of the Michigan Territory, to the far west of Lake Superior during the summer of 1826 to meet with American Indian leaders and search for the source of the Mississippi River. This drawing shows the American Fur Trading Company post including a fenced garden area. In his description of the post, McKenney identified separate cemetaries for whites and American Indians behind the garden.

Date
1827
Subjects
Agriculture
American Fur Company
Fur trade
Places
Fond du Lac (Duluth, Minn.)
Seven Days of the Life of a Soldier

Manuscript account by Major Alexander Thompson of a canoe journey from Green Bay to Mackinac Island, between June 1 and June 23, 1831. Accompanied by William Holiday, proprietor of an American Fur Company trading house in the interior, who was returning to headquarters in Mackinac to settle his accounts, and by eight French voyageurs or “pork-eaters,” Thompson left Green Bay on June 1, 1831 in a 30-foot bark canoe owned by the Company. As the travelers made their way around the Bay, he commented on the forests, wildlife, and the customs and legends of the Menomonee, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Winnebago Indians. Weather-bound by strong winds to their camp near Vermilion Island, Thompson hiked along some Indian trails, observing the abundant wild strawberries, roses, peas, grapes, currants, and gooseberries, and moccasin flowers, as well as bear, deer, bald eagle, and sturgeon. Strong winds were a constant hindrance throughout the trip, but finally, at Louse Island, they entered Lake Michigan, paddling at night in the moonlight to take advantage of the calm waters. They arrived at Mackinac Island on June 23rd, and were greeted by Company official Robert Stuart.

Creator
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Date
1831
Subjects
American Fur Company
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
Green Bay (Wis.)
Mackinac Island (Mich.)
People
Holiday, William
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
An Improved Edition of a Map of the Surveyed Part of the Territory of Michigan

John Farmer became the premier cartographer of Michigan in the early nineteenth century, publishing his first map of the state in 1826. In this map that Farmer published in English in 1835, he neglects Indian villages, unlike the 1834 version published in German, and also shows that an increasing part of the state has been covered by the rectangular land survey.

Creator
Farmer, John, 1798-1859
Date
1835?
Subjects
Mapping
Places
Mackinac Island (Mich.)
Michigan