50 results for “Great Lakes Region”

A New Map of the United States of North America


Creator
Cary, John, 1754-1835.
Date
1805
Places
Great Lakes Region
North America
Seven Days of the Life of a Soldier

Manuscript account by Major Alexander Thompson of a canoe journey from Green Bay to Mackinac Island, between June 1 and June 23, 1831. Accompanied by William Holiday, proprietor of an American Fur Company trading house in the interior, who was returning to headquarters in Mackinac to settle his accounts, and by eight French voyageurs or “pork-eaters,” Thompson left Green Bay on June 1, 1831 in a 30-foot bark canoe owned by the Company. As the travelers made their way around the Bay, he commented on the forests, wildlife, and the customs and legends of the Menomonee, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Winnebago Indians. Weather-bound by strong winds to their camp near Vermilion Island, Thompson hiked along some Indian trails, observing the abundant wild strawberries, roses, peas, grapes, currants, and gooseberries, and moccasin flowers, as well as bear, deer, bald eagle, and sturgeon. Strong winds were a constant hindrance throughout the trip, but finally, at Louse Island, they entered Lake Michigan, paddling at night in the moonlight to take advantage of the calm waters. They arrived at Mackinac Island on June 23rd, and were greeted by Company official Robert Stuart.

Creator
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Date
1831
Subjects
American Fur Company
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
Green Bay (Wis.)
Mackinac Island (Mich.)
People
Holiday, William
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Carte des cinq Grands Lacs du Canada

Created 150 years after the Champlain map (image #269), this map shows that French map-makers had gathered much more information about the interior of North America. By modern standards, however, the map distorts the shape of the Great Lakes. Nevertheless, the map includes important trade information such as the location of portages, Native American communities, and French towns and forts.

Creator
Bellin, Jacques Nicolas, 1703-1772
Date
1764
Subjects
Empire
Mapping
Trade
Places
French Canada
Great Lakes
Great Lakes Region
Indian shooting fish

A Native American man crouches at the bank of a river. He holds a bow and arrow and aims at the water.

Creator
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Date
1853
Subjects
Fishing
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
Color satellite photo of the Great Lakes

In satellite imagery, the Great Lakes dominate the landscape of central North America, uninterrupted by the political boundaries between the U.S. and Canada, or between states and provinces.

Creator
Leshkevich, G.
Date
1995
Subjects
Great Lakes Region
Mapping
Places
Great Lakes
Schauplatz des Kriegs zwischen Engelland und seinen Collonien in America, 1776

This map of the “Arena of the War between England and her Colonies in America” was published in Frankfurt, Germany, in 1776, at the beginning of that war. The names of American Indian tribes are visible across the Great Lakes region.

Creator
Jaeger, Johann Christian
Date
1776
Subjects
Indians of North America
Revolutionary War
Places
United States
Michigan Central Railroad Niagara Falls Route

The Michigan Central Railroad knit together an international Great Lakes region, connecting upper and lower Michigan to Chicago, Ontario, New York, and Boston. At Niagara Falls the Michigan Central carried passengers across a cantilevered bridge past a scenic gorge.

Date
1888
Subjects
Railroads
Lac Superieur et autres lieux ou sont les missions des peres de la Compagnie de Iesus, comprises sous le nom d'Outaouacs

This map of the upper Great Lakes shows several Jesuit missions as well as American Indian communities.

Creator
Dablon, Claude
Date
1673
Subjects
Indians of North America
Mapping
Religion
Places
Great Lakes
Lake Superior
Fur trade contract, 1692

Fur trade contract, dated Sept. 15, 1692 in Ville-Marie, Québec, concerning transport of merchandise to Michilimackinac and Chicago to be traded for beaver pelts. The contract describes an agreement between François Francoeur dit Lavalle—represented here by his wife Marie Magdeleine St.-Jean, authorized by him to conduct their joint business affairs while he was away “aux Illinois”—and four voyageurs: Simon Guillory, Jean Baptiste Jarry, Louis Roy, and by proxy, Simon Roy. For 500 livres each in beaver pelts, and their food, the voyageurs agreed to make the journey to Michilimackinac and “Chicagou” (one of the earliest references to Chicago in a voyageur contract) the following spring, in two canoes to be furnished by them, to transport merchandise, and to make the return with beaver pelts. At each of the trading centers, the four voyageurs have permission to use one of the canoes to trade 300 livres of merchandise each for personal profit. There are also provisions concerning voyageurs “hyvernants,” those who spend the winter out in trapping country in Illinois. The contract includes Francoeur's footnotes in margins, marked in the text with a sequence of carats and circles. Each addition is initialed by two or three of the parties involved, and the document is signed by St.-Jean and Guillory; the notary, Maugue; and witnesses Jean Legras and Adrien Betouni. Jarry and Roy did not sign, as they did not know how to write their names.

Creator
Francoeur, François
Guillory, Simon
Jarry, Jean Baptiste
Roy, Louis
Roy, Simon
St.-Jean, Marie Magdeleine
Date
1692
Subjects
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Fort Michilimackinac (Mackinaw City, Mich.)
French Canada
Great Lakes
Québec
People
Francoeur dit Lavalle, François
Carte geographique de la Nouvelle France

Champlain's 1612 map suggests how little Europeans knew about the interior of North America at the time. For instance, only two the the five Great Lakes are visible.

Creator
Champlain, Samuel de, 1567-1635
Date
1612
Subjects
Mapping
North America
Places
French Canada