4 results for “Goldman, Emma”

Capitalism, Humanity, Government

Chicago's anarchist community participated in a national and international debate about the nature of state power in modern society. This cover of Emma Goldman's Mother Earth magazine, drawn by the Dada artist Man Ray, depicts humanity torn apart by capitalism and government, each a different manifestation of the same monstrous reality. Although published in New York City, Mother Earth reported regularly on the activities of Chicago anarchists, and Goldman spent a good deal of time in the city.

Creator
Man Ray
Date
August 1914
People
Goldman, Emma
Haymarket Monument, Waldheim Cemetery

A monument to four anarchist labor leaders executed in Chicago on November 11, 1887. After a trial that is generally considered a miscarriage of justice, the men were convicted of killing police with a bomb. The words at the base of the statue are those of Albert Parsons, “The day will come when our silence will be more powerful than the voices you are throttling today.” Other important labor and radical leaders, including Emma Goldman, chose to be buried near this monument.

Creator
Weinert, Albert
Subjects
Anarchism
Labor unions
Radicalism
Visions of history
Places
Chicago, Illinois
The Season in Full Swing at the Dill Pickles

An advertisement for a week of events at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club suggests the eclectic mix of radicalism and ribaldry typical of the club. During the fall of 1930 Mae West's melodrama “Sex” played at Chicago's Garrick Theater promising audiences “55 people” on stage and “555 Thrills.” Earlier in the year, West became an unlikely icon of free speech when she prevailed over New York City prosecutors who accused her of producing obscene plays. Hypolite Havel was an anarchist intellectual and former associate of Emma Goldman. Ralph Chaplin was an editor and illustrator for the Industrial Workers of the World and the author of the labor anthem “Solidarity Forever.”

Date
1930
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Eighth Map to accompany Willard's _History of the United States_

Maps such as these appeared in books for schoolchildren learning history and geography. Unlike earlier maps, this one presents the area west of the Appalachian Mountains as empty land.

Creator
Maverick, Samuel, 1789-1845
Date
1828
Subjects
Education
Empire
Indians of North America
Mapping
Places
United States