5 results for “Gold Rush”

Emigrant Party on the Road to California

Hearing about the discovery of gold in California, many people headed westward along the Oregon-California Trail.

Date
1850
Subjects
Emigration and immigration
Gold Rush
Places
California
Utah
The March of Destiny

The scene depicts “Pioneer Heroes” in a caravan heading westward. An inset in the upper left portrays migrants crossing the Appalachian mountains in Kentucky, while an inset in the bottom right corner dramatizes the search for gold in California.

Date
1883
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Gold Rush
Indians of North America
Visions of history
Places
California
Kentucky
If You Are Bound to Go to the Gold Fields of the Black Hills

The discovery of gold in the Black Hills of the Dakota Territory drew thousands of fortune-seekers, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad hoped they would all be paying passengers on their lines. Gold mining in the Black Hills also touched off many years of violence between the Sioux who claimed the territory and the U.S. government, which sought to protect the interests of white settlers and miners.

Creator
Chicago and North Western Railway Company
Date
ca. 1877
Subjects
Gold Mining
Railroads
Places
Black Hills (S.D. and Wyo.)
The Massacre of United States Troops by the Sioux and Cheyenne Indians Near Fort Philip Kearney, Dakotah Territory, December 22nd, 1866

In 1866 U. S. soldiers sought to defend three recently built forts protecting the Bozeman Trail leading to the gold fields of Montana. Lieutenant Colonel W. J. Fetterman led eighty men against the Sioux, expecting an easy victory, and he and all his soldiers were killed. A peace treaty was concluded in 1868.

Date
January 19, 1867
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Indians of North America
Sioux
Places
Dakota Territory
A Night in Bohemia: Dill Pickle Masked Ball

Among the most popular Dill Pickle Club events were its frequent masquerade balls. These events appealed to a broad range of partygoers, allowing wealthy residents of the Gold Coast to mingle in relative anonymity with working people and artists. Masquerade balls also attracted gay men and women. Under cover of the party, women could dress as men and men as women. With so many people cross-dressing, few took notice of same sex couples. Although the Dill Pickle Club closed early in the 1930s, citywide Halloween Balls continued to be meeting places for gay men and women into the 1940s.

Date
1916
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)