10 results for “February 1916”

Cover to _International Socialist Review_, October 1915

Published by Charles H. Kerr Co. from 1900 to 1918, the International Socialist Review became the principal voice of the Socialist Party's left wing, utilizing the format of a mass circulation magazine.

Date
February 1916
Subjects
Socialism
Working class
Cover to _International Socialist Review_, November 1915

Published by Charles H. Kerr Co. from 1900 to 1918, the International Socialist Review became the principal voice of the Socialist Party's left wing, utilizing the format of a mass circulation magazine.

Date
February 1916
Subjects
Labor unions
Socialism
Strikes
Working class
Cover to _International Socialist Review_, February 1916

A worker pauses for his mid-day meal. Gazing beyond an industrial landscape he focuses on a domed building symbolizing the seat of government. Published by Charles H. Kerr Co. from 1900 to 1918, the International Socialist Review became the principal voice of the Socialist Party's left wing, utilizing the format of a mass circulation magazine.

Date
February 1916
Subjects
Socialism
Working class
Margaret Sanger's Chicago speaking engagements, 1916

In 1913 and 1914 New Yorker Margaret Sanger published several articles on birth control, venereal disease, and women's rights that resulted in federal obscenity charges against her. When the charges were dropped in 1916 Sanger toured the country giving lectures promoting birth control. Chicagoan Margaret C. Anderson, editor of The Little Review, was an ardent supporter of birth control, and used her magazine to promote Sanger's lectures.

Date
1916
Subjects
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Meadowbrook Farms sign directing drivers

Meadowbrook Farms, formerly known as “American Heritage Farms,” is a producer cooperative based in Rantoul, Illinois, that processes pork products for organic and specialty markets, especially in Europe and Japan. The company's logo is a traditional farm scene.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Agriculture
Industry
Places
Illinois
Joe Hill's Funeral

In November 1915, thousands attended the Chicago funeral of songwriter Joe Hill, who was executed by firing squad in a Utah prison. According to his supporters in the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), Hill was falsely convicted of murder. The Swedish immigrant was best known for songs such as The Rebel Girl and The Preacher and the Slave, which gave new political lyrics to popular or traditional tunes.

Date
January 1916
Subjects
Immigration
Industrial Workers of the World
Labor unions
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Hill, Joe
A Night in Bohemia: Dill Pickle Masked Ball

Among the most popular Dill Pickle Club events were its frequent masquerade balls. These events appealed to a broad range of partygoers, allowing wealthy residents of the Gold Coast to mingle in relative anonymity with working people and artists. Masquerade balls also attracted gay men and women. Under cover of the party, women could dress as men and men as women. With so many people cross-dressing, few took notice of same sex couples. Although the Dill Pickle Club closed early in the 1930s, citywide Halloween Balls continued to be meeting places for gay men and women into the 1940s.

Date
1916
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Charles A. Eastman

Also known by his Dakota name Ohiyesa, Eastman grew up with his grandmother and uncle in Manitobabut became a Christian at his father's urging. He attended Knox and Dartmouth Colleges, and received a medical degree from Boston University. He married a white classmate, Elaine Goodale, and then served as a medical officer at the Pine Ridge reservation in the early 1890s.

Date
1916
Subjects
Indians of North America
Sioux
Factory worker filing small gun parts, Milwaukee

Photographers working for the U.S. Office of War Information documented the dependence of factories on women workers. In February 1943 this young woman at the Vilter Manufacturing Company in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, had one brother in the Coast Guard, and another going into the Army.

Creator
Hollem, Howard R.
Date
1943
Subjects
Gender and society
World War II
Places
Wisconsin
Charles A. Eastman at Knox College in 1880

Also known by his Dakota name Ohiyesa, Eastman grew up with his grandmother and uncle in Manitobabut became a Christian at his father's urging. He attended Knox and Dartmouth Colleges, and received a medical degree from Boston University. He married a white classmate, Elaine Goodale, and then served as a medical officer at the Pine Ridge reservation in the early 1890s.

Date
1880
Subjects
Education
Indians of North America
Sioux
Places
Illinois