19 results for “Farmer, John, 1798-1859”

Karte von Michigan

John Farmer became the premier cartographer of Michigan in the early nineteenth century, publishing his first map of the state in 1826. This 1834 map, published in German, indicates the location of a number of Native American settlements. Maps like this would have been used by prospective settlers hoping to identify suitable land in the territory.

Creator
Farmer, John, 1798-1859
Date
1834
Subjects
Immigration
Indians of North America
Mapping
Places
Michigan
An Improved Edition of a Map of the Surveyed Part of the Territory of Michigan

John Farmer became the premier cartographer of Michigan in the early nineteenth century, publishing his first map of the state in 1826. In this map that Farmer published in English in 1835, he neglects Indian villages, unlike the 1834 version published in German, and also shows that an increasing part of the state has been covered by the rectangular land survey.

Creator
Farmer, John, 1798-1859
Date
1835?
Subjects
Mapping
Places
Mackinac Island (Mich.)
Michigan
The Liberty Bond Mutual Benefit Association-The Money is Mostly Spent at Home

The U.S. entered Europe's Great War in 1917 as a deeply divided nation. To rally the country to the cause of war, the federal government launched a massive public relations effort drawing on the most talented communicators in business, journalism, and government. In this advertisement from the Chicago Tribune of October 1917, popular cartoonist John T. McCutcheon encourages Americans to support the war effort by purchasing government bonds. With the letters US in the background, a circle of men representing different occupations is united by Liberty Bonds. The poster suggests that only un-American outsiders would refuse to support the bond drive.

Creator
McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949
Date
1917
Subjects
World War I
There Ought to Be School for the Instruction of Women Voters

This cartoon appeared in the Chicago Tribune five days after the Illinois House of Representatives approved women's suffrage in Illinois.

Creator
McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949
Date
1913
Subjects
Education
Gender and society
Suffrage
Places
Illinois
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish), "Custer as a Comanche"

Undated painting on cardboard with an annotation, “Custer as a Comanche.” A similar painting (image #202) depicts “Custer as a White Man.”

Creator
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish)
Date
n.d.
Subjects
Art
Indians of North America
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish), "Custer as a White Man"

Painting on paper by the Native American artist Red Fish. The hand written caption, believed to be by Aaron McGaffey Beede who commissioned the work, reads “Custer as a white man/made by Red Fish/Indians believe Custer/has the “tonj” of an Indian.” The word “tonj” was usually translated as “spirit” in the 19th century, suggesting that Native Americans respected Custer as a fallen warrior. Another image by Red Fish (image #50) shows “Custer as a Comanche.”

Creator
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish)
Date
n.d.
Subjects
Art
Indians of North America
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Farmer planting corn near Creston, Iowa

Although many had switched to motorized tractors by the late 1940s, this farmer in southwestern Iowa was still using horses.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Agriculture
Farming
Places
Iowa
Speech of John Hossack on the Fugitive Slave Law

The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 required the federal government to assist with retrieving runaway slaves even in free states like Illinois. In an act of civil disobedience, businessman John Hossack and seven others helped a runaway slave named Jim Grey escape from federal custody just as he was about to be sent back South. Convicted in a Chicago court, Hossack paid a $100 fine and spent ten days in jail, although he was released each day to dine with Chicago officials and prominent citizens. In his strongly worded defense, Hossack argued, “the parties who prostituted the constitution to the support of slavery, are traitors.”

Creator
Hossack, John
Date
1860
Subjects
Law
Slavery
United States of America Compiled from the latest & best Authorities

Like other maps from the early years of the United States, John Melish's 1818 map claimed territory for the new nation. The odd shape of the state of Illinois suggests the mapmaker's limited knowledge of the region, perhaps due to the fact that most American settlement at the time was closer to the Ohio River. The map includes references to American Indian settlements to the west of the Mississippi River.

Creator
Melish, John, 1771-1822
Date
1818
Subjects
Mapping
Places
North America
A New Map of the United States of North America


Creator
Cary, John, 1754-1835.
Date
1805
Places
Great Lakes Region
North America