9 results for “Empire”

Across the Continent

Frances Palmer, who migrated from her native England to the United States in 1842 at the age of 30, was an artist who created some of the most popular lithographs sold by the Currier and Ives partnership.

Creator
Currier, Charles, 1818-1887
Ives, James Merritt, d. 1895.
Date
1868
Subjects
Empire
Frontier and pioneer life
Transportation
Visions of history
A Map of the British Empire in America with the French, and Spanish settlements adjacent thereto

Commissioned by the British Board of Trade and Plantations at a time of imperial conflict with France, this map emphasized the westward extent of British territorial claims in North America. The map also prominently features British claims in the Caribbean Sea.

Creator
Popple, Henry, d. 1743
Date
1733
Subjects
Empire
Mapping
Places
North America
A Squad of Genuine Cuban Insurgents

When the United States declared war on Spain in 1898 it was in part to support the independence movement in Cuba. For William Cody, the good-versus-evil struggle in Cuba mirrored the dramas of western combat he regularly presented in his Wild West Shows.

Creator
Courier Litho. Co., Buffalo, N.Y.
Date
1898
Subjects
Empire
Wild west shows
Major General Frederick Middleton

Major General Frederick Middleton led the Canadian forces against the Northwest Rebellion led by Louis Riel. Middleton was a long-serving officer in the British imperial armed forces. He he served in campaigns against the Maori of New Zealand and the 1857 rebellion in India. This image from a pictorial account of the Riel Rebellion portrays Middleton and his officers as the zenith of imperial order. In reality, the Canadian soldiers he led into battle were poorly trained and unprepared for actual combat.

Date
1885
Subjects
Empire
Riel Rebellion, 1885
Places
Canada
Saskatchewan
Eighth Map to accompany Willard's _History of the United States_

Maps such as these appeared in books for schoolchildren learning history and geography. Unlike earlier maps, this one presents the area west of the Appalachian Mountains as empty land.

Creator
Maverick, Samuel, 1789-1845
Date
1828
Subjects
Education
Empire
Indians of North America
Mapping
Places
United States
Carte des cinq Grands Lacs du Canada

Created 150 years after the Champlain map (image #269), this map shows that French map-makers had gathered much more information about the interior of North America. By modern standards, however, the map distorts the shape of the Great Lakes. Nevertheless, the map includes important trade information such as the location of portages, Native American communities, and French towns and forts.

Creator
Bellin, Jacques Nicolas, 1703-1772
Date
1764
Subjects
Empire
Mapping
Trade
Places
French Canada
Great Lakes
Great Lakes Region
Plan de Missilimakinak avec la description de la route du Missisipi

The upper right quadrant of the image details the Straits of Mackinac region, including the fort and Indian village at Saint Ignace and the fort established across the Straits at latter-day Mackinaw City; 16 lines of accompanying notes mention the presence of 600 coureurs de bois in 1716. On same sheet are maps of the Fort Chambly in Québec and Fort Frontenac (later the site of Kingston, Ontario).

Date
ca. 1717
Subjects
Empire
Indians of North America
Mapping
Places
Fort Michilimackinac (Mackinaw City, Mich.)
Emancipation Parade in Windsor, Ontario

In the 1930s residents of Windsor, Ontario, began celebrating Britain's 1833 Emancipation Act, which officially banned slavery in Canada and other parts of the British Empire.

Date
1952
Subjects
Emancipation
Places
Canada
Ontario
Ukrainian-Canadian Festival, Saskatoon

A man and woman in traditional dress dance atop a map of Canada. As part of its plan to populate the western provinces the Canadian government encouraged immigration from many European countries. Before World War I cut off trans-Atlantic migration, more than 150,000 Ukrainians had settled in Canada, many of them in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Thousands more arrived in the 1920s. Non-British immigrants often experienced discrimination at the hands of native-born Canadians, and were encouraged to abandon their language and traditional clothes. During World War I, thousands of Ukrainians were imprisoned because they were originally from Canada’s enemy, the Austrian Empire. By the late 1940s, some of the prejudice had tempered as immigrants and their children claimed the right to be Canadians and immigrants.

Creator
Association of Ukrainian Canadians
Date
July 31, 1946
Subjects
Dancers
Immigration
Places
Saskatchewan