10 results for “Dairy farmers”

Boy separating cream at the Rader Farm, Knoxville, Illinois

Children of farm families were expected to help out with farm work from a young age. Here one of the sons of the farmer Scott Rader uses a machine to separate cream from raw milk. Behind him sits a Maytag clothes washing machine. As more farm homes gained access to electricity over the mid-twentieth century, domestic machinery transformed the work of maintaining a farm household.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Children
Dairy farmers
Farming
Places
Illinois
Milking time at the Rader farm, Knoxville, Illinois

Leroy Rader milks a cow on his family farm near Knoxville, Illinois, 1948. Even in the 20th century, children's work was an important part of successful farming.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Agriculture
Children
Dairy farmers
Farming
Places
Illinois
Farm residences in St. Clair County, Illinois

Representations of the farms of Ernst Dressel and Otto Schott, both in St. Clair County, Illinois, near East St. Louis, suggest subtle variations in the ways in which farmers sought to be represented to their neighbors and to history.

Date
1892
Places
Illinois
Saint Clair County (Ill.)
Grain elevators, Central Illinois

Two grain elevator facilities west of Champaign, Illinois. On the left, the larger facility is that of The Andersons Grain and Ethanol Group. On the right, the much smaller Rising Farmers Grain Company.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Agriculture
Industry
Places
Illinois
Corn planting near Friend, [Nebraska]

Two farmers planting with a tractor in eastern Nebraska. Photographer Esther Bubley and her colleague Russell Lee documented daily life along the route of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad in 1948 in preparation for the book Granger Country.

Creator
Bubley, Esther
Date
1948
Subjects
Agriculture
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Places
Nebraska
Homesteads and Pre-Emptions

During the late 19th century the U.S. government aided settlement of farm farmers on the Great Plains by offering land at very low prices to those who would establish farms. As this description of the process indicates, immigrants seeking homestead land were required to declared their intention to become American citizen. For European immigrants this was a very small barrier.

Date
1872
Subjects
Agriculture
Immigration
Railroads
Places
Great Plains
Kansas
Nebraska
Cheap Farms for Settlers

A broadside advertising land for sale in western Iowa. In addition to selling farm land, the American Emigrant Company recruited European workers and farmers to migrate to the western United States, arranged their travel and work contracts, and handled money sent home by immigrants. Prominent business and political leaders were major investors in the company.

Date
1865
Subjects
Advertisements
Education
Farming
Immigration
Railroads
Places
Iowa
Oak Park Farm

In the late 19th century prosperous farmers like Henry Coppock of Johnson County in eastern Kansas often paid to have elaborate engravings of their properties placed in county atlases. In this case, a map of the property with images of crops and animals accompanies the image the farm buildings and grounds. The map indicates that Coppock's farm was on two major roads and a rail line that linked him to the nearby urban hub of Kansas City.

Creator
Heisler, E. F.
Smith, D. M.
Date
1874
Subjects
Agriculture
Mapping
Transportation
Places
Kansas
English lessons

Finnish-speaking lumber workers in Duluth, Minnesota, learn English through a class in parliamentary procedure. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries tens of millions of farmers and workers from Europe, Asia, and Latin America moved to North America in search of work. Although anti-immigrant sentiment, and sometimes violence, was common in the U.S. and Canada, governments and private agencies also tried to teach immigrants the culture and language of their adopted land. In some cases, immigrants eagerly participated in these “Americanization” and Canadianization” programs, especially when immigrants considered the programs helpful to their own goals. But in other cases, immigrants rejected and resented forced conformity.

Date
1930s
Subjects
Education
Immigration
Places
Minnesota
Towards the Dawn!

A family walks an uphill road toward a rising sun symbolizing the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).  The Great Depression of the 1930s hit farmers and rural communities particularly hard.  Across the Great Plains rural people supported a variety of political movements that sought greater involvement of national governments in the management of the economy.  In 1932 several Canadian farmer, labor, and socialist groups came together to form a political party known as the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).  Influenced by socialist and agrarian reform movements in Europe and North America, he goal of the CCF was an economic system “in which the principle regulating production, distribution and exchange will be the supplying of human needs and not the making of profits,” according an early manifesto.  The CCF moderated some of its more radical positions, but remained a self-described “socialist” party when it won a majority of the seats in the Saskatchewan provincial assembly in 1944.  The CCF maintained its political leadership in province for 20 years enacting important social legislation effecting health care, education, and rural electrification. In the 1960s, the CCF merged with other groups to become the New Democratic Party.

Creator
Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation
Date
ca. 1930s
Subjects
Gender and society
Political campaigns
Socialism
Working class
Places
Saskatchewan