18 results for “Civil rights”

Frontispiece to Clarence Darrow's _Argument in Defense of the Communists_

Among those arrested in January 1920 were twenty members of the Communist Labor Party, one of two newly formed left wing parties that emulated the revolutionary example of the Russian Bolsheviks. Charged under a wartime sedition law, the Communists faced long jail terms. In their defense, well-known civil liberties attorney Clarence Darrow argued that the government targeted the Communists for their beliefs rather than any criminal activities.

Date
1920
Subjects
Civil rights
Communism
Law
People
Darrow, Clarence
Rights of Married Women

Myra Colby Bradwell began publishing the Chicago Legal News in 1868, to agitate for a wide range of women's rights. In this editorial, Bradwell argued for the broadest possible interpretation of an 1869 Illinois law granting married women the right to control their own incomes. As a married woman, Bradwell confronted several legal problems. She had to obtain a special state charter in order to control the publication of her own newspaper. Also, she was qualified to become an attorney, but she was denied admission to the bar because she was married. She appealed this decision to the United States Supreme Court, but lost. Twenty years later, Illinois changed its law and, acting on her original petition of 1869, admitted Bradwell to the bar.

Creator
Bradwell, Myra
Date
1869
Subjects
Civil rights
Gender and society
Law
People
Bradwell, Myra
Terrorism

In coordinated raids organized by Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer across the nation during January 1920, federal and local law enforcement officials arrested thousands of radicals, trade union militants, and immigrants. Officials warned that this breach of civil liberties was necessary because radicals were plotting to overthrow the government. In response, the Chicago Federation of Labor's newspaper attacked Palmer's Red Raids as employer-inspired retribution for the massive strikes that had paralyzed industry during 1919.

Creator
Chicago Federation of Labor
Date
January 10, 1920
Subjects
Civil rights
Labor
Memorandum regarding the Till murder trial, September 13, 1955, _Chicago Sun-Times_.

While visiting his relatives in Mississippi during the summer of 1955, fourteen-year old Chicagoan Emmett Till was lynched for allegedly whistling at a white woman. Till's mother insisted on bringing her son's body back to Chicago and having an open casket funeral. Thousands of black Chicagoans came to bear witness to his brutal killing, and Jet magazine published dramatic images of Till's battered body. The state of Mississippi brought charges of murder against two white men, and an all-white jury quickly found them not guilty. The Department of Justice has recently re-opened an investigation into the case.

Date
1955
Subjects
African American Life
Civil rights
Journalism
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Southern States
People
Till, Emmitt
UPI Press wire demonstration at the _Chicago Sun-Times_ regarding editorial "Now that the March is Over," August 29, 1963

While returning to Chicago by train from the 1963 March on Washington, some civil rights activists read a Sun-Times editorial critical of Martin Luther King, Jr., and other leaders. As this newswire transcript recounts, some 300 activists marched directly from the train station to the Sun-Times building to picket. The newspaper's editors agreed to meet with leaders of the protest.

Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Washington D.C.
People
Black, Timuel
Don't Shop Downtown Until Willis Goes

Chicago activists distributed the “Stop! Don't Shop Downtown” flyer during a campaign to oust Chicago Public Schools superintendent Benjamin Willis. Activists charged Willis with supporting segregated and inadequately funded schools for African Americans. In 1965, over 100,000 Chicago Public School students joined a two-day school boycott to protest the renewal of Willis's contract by the Chicago Board of Education.

Creator
Students Nonviolent Coordinating Committee
Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Boycotts
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
City of Industry, Hamilton, Ontario, 2007

A steel mill releases smoke and flames into the sky above Hamilton, Ontario. A working class neighborhood is visible in the foreground bordering the industrial plant. Since the late 19th century Hamilton has been one of Canada's major industrial centers and home to an activist labor movement. Despite a shift to service industries, it remains home to Canada's two largest steel mills.

Creator
Walsh, Chris P.
Date
2007
Subjects
Industry
Places
Canada
Ontario
ADM soybean mill, Decatur, Illinois, April 2007

ADM (formerly Archer Daniels Midland) operates over 200 facilities worldwide that process oilseeds, corn, wheat and cocoa. Founded in Minneapolis in 1902, the company expanded rapidly after World War II. Based in the central Illinois city of Decatur, ADM is one of a handful of global corporations that produce the basic ingredients of modern processed food such as grains, flavors, and protein additives.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Agriculture
Industry
Places
Illinois
Heartland Community Church, Decatur, Illinois

The Heartland Community Church in Decatur, Illinois, is across the street from a mill belonging to the Archer Daniels Midland Company, a major agricultural processing company.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Industry
Religion
Places
Decatur, Illinois
Haymarket monument, Chicago

In 2004 the city of Chicago dedicated a monument to commemorate the anarchist labor leaders arrested in the wake of a bomb explosion in Haymarket Square on May 4, 1886. Behind the monument a giant advertisement for a luxury SUV covers the entire wall of a building.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2004
Subjects
Advertising
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Labor