11 results for “Children”

Boy separating cream at the Rader Farm, Knoxville, Illinois

Children of farm families were expected to help out with farm work from a young age. Here one of the sons of the farmer Scott Rader uses a machine to separate cream from raw milk. Behind him sits a Maytag clothes washing machine. As more farm homes gained access to electricity over the mid-twentieth century, domestic machinery transformed the work of maintaining a farm household.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Children
Dairy farmers
Farming
Places
Illinois
Milking time at the Rader farm, Knoxville, Illinois

Leroy Rader milks a cow on his family farm near Knoxville, Illinois, 1948. Even in the 20th century, children's work was an important part of successful farming.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Agriculture
Children
Dairy farmers
Farming
Places
Illinois
Lumber docks, Chicago River

Children watch the photographer as a tugboat pulls a ship through the Chicago River. To the left workers unload lumber from a ship.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Children
Industry
Lumber
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago River
Woman with child in Union Station

A woman and child sit in the waiting room of Chicago's Union Station, 1948.

Creator
Esther Bubley
Date
1948
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Children
Railroads
Transportation
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Children walking on railroad tracks near Knoxville, Illinois

In 1948 the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad hired two photographers to document work at the company and life in the communities it served. A series of pictures featured life on the Rader family farm near Knoxville, Illinois. Images like this one of the Rader children on their way to school were intended to show the wholesome relationship between families, communities, and the railroad corporation.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Children
Railroads
Places
Illinois
Scott Rader Farm near Knoxville, Illinois

Scott Rader's four children walk behind a small herd of cattle.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Agriculture
Children
Farming
Places
Illinois
Emigration to the Western Country

An illustration of a caravan of emigrants, men, women, children and animals, traveling westward.

Creator
Bobbett, Albert, ca. 1824-1888 or 9
Date
1877
Subjects
Emigration and immigration
Places
West (U.S.)
Eunice Tietjens

Eunice Hammond Tietjens (1884-1944) poses in a robe that suggests her interest in the cultures of Asia. Tietjens was long associated with the literary and artistic circle around Harriet Monroe's Poetry Magazine. The daughter of a prominent family, she had an unconventional education in Europe, traveled to Japan, China, and the South Pacific as an adult, and developed an interest in eastern philosophies and religions. At different times she was a poet, novelist, journalist, author of children's books, lecturer, and editor.

Subjects
Literature
Places
Chicago, Illinois
People
Tietjens, Eunice
Ukrainian-Canadian Festival, Saskatoon

A man and woman in traditional dress dance atop a map of Canada. As part of its plan to populate the western provinces the Canadian government encouraged immigration from many European countries. Before World War I cut off trans-Atlantic migration, more than 150,000 Ukrainians had settled in Canada, many of them in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Thousands more arrived in the 1920s. Non-British immigrants often experienced discrimination at the hands of native-born Canadians, and were encouraged to abandon their language and traditional clothes. During World War I, thousands of Ukrainians were imprisoned because they were originally from Canada’s enemy, the Austrian Empire. By the late 1940s, some of the prejudice had tempered as immigrants and their children claimed the right to be Canadians and immigrants.

Creator
Association of Ukrainian Canadians
Date
July 31, 1946
Subjects
Dancers
Immigration
Places
Saskatchewan
Chicago Indian Village

In the late spring of 1970, a group of American Indians set up an encampment behind Wrigley Field. Led by Indian activist Mike Chosa, the Chicago Indian Village (CIV) protested against inadequate housing and social services for Chicago's 15,000 American Indians. The following summer, Chosa led a group of fifty men, women, and children in a two-week occupation of an abandoned parcel of government land at Belmont Harbor. Evicted from the site, they took refuge at the Fourth Presbyterian Church. Later in 1971, the CIV occupied government land near Lemont, Illinois. As this CIV flyer illustrates, Chosa used the occupations to generate leverage with government agencies that he hoped would provide funds for social services.

Date
ca. 1970
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Chicago (Ill.)