128 results for “Chicago Federation of Labor”

Terrorism

In coordinated raids organized by Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer across the nation during January 1920, federal and local law enforcement officials arrested thousands of radicals, trade union militants, and immigrants. Officials warned that this breach of civil liberties was necessary because radicals were plotting to overthrow the government. In response, the Chicago Federation of Labor's newspaper attacked Palmer's Red Raids as employer-inspired retribution for the massive strikes that had paralyzed industry during 1919.

Creator
Chicago Federation of Labor
Date
January 10, 1920
Subjects
Civil rights
Labor
Haymarket Monument, Waldheim Cemetery

A monument to four anarchist labor leaders executed in Chicago on November 11, 1887. After a trial that is generally considered a miscarriage of justice, the men were convicted of killing police with a bomb. The words at the base of the statue are those of Albert Parsons, “The day will come when our silence will be more powerful than the voices you are throttling today.” Other important labor and radical leaders, including Emma Goldman, chose to be buried near this monument.

Creator
Weinert, Albert
Subjects
Anarchism
Labor unions
Radicalism
Visions of history
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Towards the Dawn!

A family walks an uphill road toward a rising sun symbolizing the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).  The Great Depression of the 1930s hit farmers and rural communities particularly hard.  Across the Great Plains rural people supported a variety of political movements that sought greater involvement of national governments in the management of the economy.  In 1932 several Canadian farmer, labor, and socialist groups came together to form a political party known as the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).  Influenced by socialist and agrarian reform movements in Europe and North America, he goal of the CCF was an economic system “in which the principle regulating production, distribution and exchange will be the supplying of human needs and not the making of profits,” according an early manifesto.  The CCF moderated some of its more radical positions, but remained a self-described “socialist” party when it won a majority of the seats in the Saskatchewan provincial assembly in 1944.  The CCF maintained its political leadership in province for 20 years enacting important social legislation effecting health care, education, and rural electrification. In the 1960s, the CCF merged with other groups to become the New Democratic Party.

Creator
Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation
Date
ca. 1930s
Subjects
Gender and society
Political campaigns
Socialism
Working class
Places
Saskatchewan
Chicago Under the Mob

When Frederic Remington wrote and illustrated this article about labor unrest in Chicago he was already a well-known for his images of western themes. The text describes Chicago's immigrant workers as an uncivilized and violent mob. The troops sent to restore order, Remington points out, had recently participated in the massacre of Native Americans at Wounded Knee, South Dakota.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1895
Subjects
Labor
Pullman Company
Pullman Strike, 1894
Working class
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Photograph of Lucy Parsons

Parsons self-identified as Native American and Chicana. Her family said she was black. Parsons grew up in Texas where she met Albert Richard Parsons in 1869. They married in 1872, although there is not a marriage license on record, and they moved to Chicago in 1873. Lucy Parsons was a prominent figure in Chicago's anarchist and radical labor circles until her death in 1942.

Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Parsons, Lucy
Dill Pickle Club House and Chapel

A handbill advertises three plays at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club. An inset map shows artists' studios nearby. The plays touched on social and political issues including labor conflict, abortion, drug use, and Irish nationalism.

Date
1927
Subjects
Advertisements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Strikes
Theater
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Haymarket monument, Chicago

In 2004 the city of Chicago dedicated a monument to commemorate the anarchist labor leaders arrested in the wake of a bomb explosion in Haymarket Square on May 4, 1886. Behind the monument a giant advertisement for a luxury SUV covers the entire wall of a building.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2004
Subjects
Advertising
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Labor
The Season in Full Swing at the Dill Pickles

An advertisement for a week of events at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club suggests the eclectic mix of radicalism and ribaldry typical of the club. During the fall of 1930 Mae West's melodrama “Sex” played at Chicago's Garrick Theater promising audiences “55 people” on stage and “555 Thrills.” Earlier in the year, West became an unlikely icon of free speech when she prevailed over New York City prosecutors who accused her of producing obscene plays. Hypolite Havel was an anarchist intellectual and former associate of Emma Goldman. Ralph Chaplin was an editor and illustrator for the Industrial Workers of the World and the author of the labor anthem “Solidarity Forever.”

Date
1930
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Portrait of Jack Jones, 1919

A portrait of Jack Jones by Polish immigrant artist Stanislaus Szukalski. A Canadian by birth, and a one-time labor organizer, Jones managed the Dill Pickle Club in Chicago from 1914 to 1931. His friend and collaborator Szukalski, who maintained a studio nearby, was a modernist painter and sculptor and part of the city's bohemian cultural scene. The portrait appeared in an article about Jones by the novelist Sherwood Anderson (image #137).

Creator
Szukalski, Stanislaus
Date
1919
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Immigration
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Scene of Destruction and Pillage in the Panhandle Yards

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
July 8, 1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)