125 results for “Chicago (Ill.)”

Farm residences in St. Clair County, Illinois

Representations of the farms of Ernst Dressel and Otto Schott, both in St. Clair County, Illinois, near East St. Louis, suggest subtle variations in the ways in which farmers sought to be represented to their neighbors and to history.

Date
1892
Places
Illinois
Saint Clair County (Ill.)
Chicago in 1832

This image was published in 1893 when Chicago had a population of more than a million people. A caption at the bottom reads: “This drawing taken by George Davis, a well known resident of Chicago, is a faithful landscape of the locality at the junction of the two branches of the Chicago River, then called Wolf's Point. The building on the left was a Tavern kept by Elijah Wentworth, where Gen. Scott made his headquarters during the Black Hawk War. That on the right was the Miller House. Each of them being used, as necessities might require, for Sunday Services, School Houses, Taverns and private residences. Except the Fort, they were the two most notable buildings of the place.”

Creator
Davis, George
Date
ca. 1893
Subjects
Visions of history
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
The Riot at Forty-Ninth Street, 1894

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Chicago Indian Village

In the late spring of 1970, a group of American Indians set up an encampment behind Wrigley Field. Led by Indian activist Mike Chosa, the Chicago Indian Village (CIV) protested against inadequate housing and social services for Chicago's 15,000 American Indians. The following summer, Chosa led a group of fifty men, women, and children in a two-week occupation of an abandoned parcel of government land at Belmont Harbor. Evicted from the site, they took refuge at the Fourth Presbyterian Church. Later in 1971, the CIV occupied government land near Lemont, Illinois. As this CIV flyer illustrates, Chosa used the occupations to generate leverage with government agencies that he hoped would provide funds for social services.

Date
ca. 1970
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Agricultural building at night, from northwest, 1893 World's Fair

A leading photographer of the American West, Jackson made the official set of views for the Exposition.

Creator
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942
Date
1895
Subjects
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
World's Fair worker's passbook

Christina Olson was engaged at the age of twelve to perform as a Turkish dancer in the Turkish Theater, Midway Plaisance, World's Columbian Exposition, for the summer of 1893.

Date
1893
Subjects
Christina Olson
Dance
Theater
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Cleaning the "Vistadome" Car

Railroad work in the U.S. was segregated by race well into the 1950s. African Americans held jobs for car cleaners, maids, and porters, but rarely worked as conductors or engineers. Here an African American woman cleans the interior of the Chicago, Burlington, & Quincy “Vistadome” car.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Labor
Railroads
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Sanitary Drinking Cup, Socialist Party Presidential Campaign of 1912

A re-usable drinking cup with the pictures of 1912 Socialist Party candidates for President and Vice President of the U.S. Eugene V. Debs ran for President five times between 1900 and 1920, the last time from federal prison, where he was incarcerated for his antiwar sentiments. In 1912 the Socialist Party reached its high water mark, winning nearly a million votes. Chicago socialist May Walden conceived the idea for this cup as a fund raising novelty.

Date
1912
Subjects
Political campaigns
Socialism
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Debs, Eugene V. (Eugene Victor), 1855-1926
Photograph of Lucy Parsons

Parsons self-identified as Native American and Chicana. Her family said she was black. Parsons grew up in Texas where she met Albert Richard Parsons in 1869. They married in 1872, although there is not a marriage license on record, and they moved to Chicago in 1873. Lucy Parsons was a prominent figure in Chicago's anarchist and radical labor circles until her death in 1942.

Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Parsons, Lucy
College of Complexes logo

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum. This image captures one of the College's logos.

Creator
Pastin, Pat
Places
Chicago (Ill.)