124 results for “Chicago”

Don't Shop Downtown Until Willis Goes

Chicago activists distributed the “Stop! Don't Shop Downtown” flyer during a campaign to oust Chicago Public Schools superintendent Benjamin Willis. Activists charged Willis with supporting segregated and inadequately funded schools for African Americans. In 1965, over 100,000 Chicago Public School students joined a two-day school boycott to protest the renewal of Willis's contract by the Chicago Board of Education.

Creator
Students Nonviolent Coordinating Committee
Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Boycotts
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Composite of Chicago

A view of Chicago showing ships in the harbor. Surrounding the cityscape are images of prominent buildings. The city's motto “Urbs in Horto” is surrounded by symbolic images.

Date
1857
Subjects
Advertisements
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Chicago Magazine, The West As It Is

This magazine cover shows an American Indian watching a locomotive pulling into Chicago as the sun rises over Lake Michigan.

Date
1857
Subjects
Visions of history
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
West (U.S.)
Speech of John Hossack on the Fugitive Slave Law

The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 required the federal government to assist with retrieving runaway slaves even in free states like Illinois. In an act of civil disobedience, businessman John Hossack and seven others helped a runaway slave named Jim Grey escape from federal custody just as he was about to be sent back South. Convicted in a Chicago court, Hossack paid a $100 fine and spent ten days in jail, although he was released each day to dine with Chicago officials and prominent citizens. In his strongly worded defense, Hossack argued, “the parties who prostituted the constitution to the support of slavery, are traitors.”

Creator
Hossack, John
Date
1860
Subjects
Law
Slavery
Imaginary view of the site of Chicago in 1779

This vision of some of Chicago's earliest residents was the first image in A.T. Andreas' 1886 History of Chicago. The caption notes, the site was then known as “Eschicago” and identifies the building on the north shore of the river as the cabin of Afro-French trader Jean Baptiste Point De Sable. Since the 1600s the area around the mouth of the Chicago River had been a trading ground for various Native American groups, French traders, and their mixed-race descendants.

Creator
Andreas, A. T. (Alfred Theodore), 1839-1900
Date
1884
Subjects
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Visions of history
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Section of Du Pratz's Map of Louisiana, 1757

The 1757 book A History of Louisiana by Antoine Le Page Du Pratz was among the few books carried with the Lewis & Clark expedition across the North American continent. Du Pratz had lived in present-day Louisiana and Mississippi in the early 1700s and his book described geographic and natural features of the region, including second hand accounts of travels deep into the Great Plains. This section of Du Pratz's map of central North America appeared in a history of Chicago from the 1880s.

Date
1886
Subjects
Mapping
Places
Louisiana
Mississippi River Valley
Map of Chicago in 1830 (published in 1886)

Published an 1886 history of Chicago, this map recalls a time when the city was a frontier settlement. Visible on the map are the homes and businesses of early residents as well as indications of landmarks of 1886. Maps like these suggested the rapid changes taking place in American cities during the 19th century.

Creator
Andreas, A. T. (Alfred Theodore), 1839-1900
Date
1886
Subjects
Mapping
Urbanization
Visions of history
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago in 1832

This image was published in 1893 when Chicago had a population of more than a million people. A caption at the bottom reads: “This drawing taken by George Davis, a well known resident of Chicago, is a faithful landscape of the locality at the junction of the two branches of the Chicago River, then called Wolf's Point. The building on the left was a Tavern kept by Elijah Wentworth, where Gen. Scott made his headquarters during the Black Hawk War. That on the right was the Miller House. Each of them being used, as necessities might require, for Sunday Services, School Houses, Taverns and private residences. Except the Fort, they were the two most notable buildings of the place.”

Creator
Davis, George
Date
ca. 1893
Subjects
Visions of history
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Will Amazonic Women Usurp Man's Sphere?

An advertisement for a lecture at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club, printed on the reverse of an advertisement for a lecture by Magnus Hirschfeld. Little is known about the speaker, Elizabeth Davis, who appears to have been part of the bohemian community on Chicago's north side.

Creator
Dill Pickle Club
Date
1931
Subjects
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
homosexuality
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago Under the Mob

When Frederic Remington wrote and illustrated this article about labor unrest in Chicago he was already a well-known for his images of western themes. The text describes Chicago's immigrant workers as an uncivilized and violent mob. The troops sent to restore order, Remington points out, had recently participated in the massacre of Native Americans at Wounded Knee, South Dakota.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1895
Subjects
Labor
Pullman Company
Pullman Strike, 1894
Working class
Places
Chicago (Ill.)