15 results for “Buel, James W., 1849-1920”

Types and Development of Man

An illustration from the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, conveys the racialist thinking common at the time.

Creator
Buel, James W., 1849-1920
Date
1904
Subjects
World's Fair, St. Louis, 1904
Buffalo Bill's Duel With Yellow Hand

Buffalo Bill interrupted his stage career in 1876 to become an army scout. He took the scalp of a Cheyenne warrior, Yellow Hair, whose name was mistranslated as Yellow Hand. Cody incorporated this story into his performances when he returned to the stage, and displayed Yellow Hand's scalp as a mark of authenticity.

Date
1881
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Cheyenne Indians
Frontier and pioneer life
Places
Great Plains
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Yellow Hand, 1850?-1876
Tippecanoe, the Hero of North Bend

Sheet music published during William Henry Harrison's campaign for president in 1840 recalled his role in the battle at Tippecanoe Creek in Indiana in 1811. Harrison was then governor of the Indiana Territory and led an attack on Indians led by Tecumseh and his brother, the Shawnee Prophet.

Date
1849
Subjects
Log cabins
Political campaigns
Sheet music
Places
Indiana
Across the Continent

Frances Palmer, who migrated from her native England to the United States in 1842 at the age of 30, was an artist who created some of the most popular lithographs sold by the Currier and Ives partnership.

Creator
Currier, Charles, 1818-1887
Ives, James Merritt, d. 1895.
Date
1868
Subjects
Empire
Frontier and pioneer life
Transportation
Visions of history
Tens-Kwau-Ta-Waw, the Prophet

Tenskwatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, led a major religious movement among Indians in the Midwest between 1805 and 1813. His brother Tecumseh led a parallel political effort to unify Indians in resistance to the encroachment of white settlement.

Creator
Inman, Henry, 1801-1846
King, Charles Bird, 1785-1862
Date
1848
Subjects
Indians of North America
Religion
Cover of _Clason's Touring Atlas of the United States and Canada_

Clason's Touring Atlas of the United States and Canada featured maps, tourist attractions, and “the best routes to the wonders of America.” The Clason Map Co. also produced “Clason's Green Guides” with in-depth information by state. The front cover of this map pictures an Indian waving as a car speeds past. One of the passengers, perhaps a young boy, waves back.

Creator
Clason Map Company
Date
1920
Subjects
Atlases
Tourism
Visions of history
Places
Canada
United States
Terrorism

In coordinated raids organized by Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer across the nation during January 1920, federal and local law enforcement officials arrested thousands of radicals, trade union militants, and immigrants. Officials warned that this breach of civil liberties was necessary because radicals were plotting to overthrow the government. In response, the Chicago Federation of Labor's newspaper attacked Palmer's Red Raids as employer-inspired retribution for the massive strikes that had paralyzed industry during 1919.

Creator
Chicago Federation of Labor
Date
January 10, 1920
Subjects
Civil rights
Labor
Frontispiece to Clarence Darrow's _Argument in Defense of the Communists_

Among those arrested in January 1920 were twenty members of the Communist Labor Party, one of two newly formed left wing parties that emulated the revolutionary example of the Russian Bolsheviks. Charged under a wartime sedition law, the Communists faced long jail terms. In their defense, well-known civil liberties attorney Clarence Darrow argued that the government targeted the Communists for their beliefs rather than any criminal activities.

Date
1920
Subjects
Civil rights
Communism
Law
People
Darrow, Clarence
Speech of John Hossack on the Fugitive Slave Law

The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 required the federal government to assist with retrieving runaway slaves even in free states like Illinois. In an act of civil disobedience, businessman John Hossack and seven others helped a runaway slave named Jim Grey escape from federal custody just as he was about to be sent back South. Convicted in a Chicago court, Hossack paid a $100 fine and spent ten days in jail, although he was released each day to dine with Chicago officials and prominent citizens. In his strongly worded defense, Hossack argued, “the parties who prostituted the constitution to the support of slavery, are traitors.”

Creator
Hossack, John
Date
1860
Subjects
Law
Slavery
Help Lift the Lid

An advertisement for an evening at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club.

Date
[1920 or 1926]
Subjects
Advertising
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Entertainment
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)