32 results for “Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925”

William Jennings Bryan

Born in Illinois, William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) made his political career in Nebraska. Known as the Great Commoner, he ran unsuccessfully as a Democrat for U.S. President three times. As the leader of the Democratic Party between 1896 and 1912 he forged alliances with agrarian Populists and the labor movement. As Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson he resigned to protest what he considered the President's lack of neutrality toward the war in Europe. Later in life Bryan became a vocal critic of the theory of evolution, and an ally of the emerging Christian fundamentalist movement. In 1925 he assisted with the prosecution of Tennessee biology teacher John Scopes, facing off with Chicago lawyer Clarence Darrow.

Date
1909
Subjects
Politics
Religion
People
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925
Annie Oakley

The sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860-1926) was born Phoebe Ann Moses to a poor Ohio farming family. To feed and support her family she learned to trap and shoot, and later performed shooting tricks on stage. She became a regular part of William Cody's Wild West Show in 1885. This portrait from 1899 suggests how Oakley stretched the conventional roles for women in the late 19th century as an expert shooter, although she always wore a skirt and rode sidesaddle in deference to audiences expectations.

Creator
Fox, Richard, K.
Date
1899
Subjects
Gender and society
Theater
Wild West Show
Souvenir program from Pawnee Bill's Historic Wild West

As William F. Cody had adopted the persona of Buffalo Bill, in the 1890s Gordon William Lillie adopted the name Pawnee Bill and started his own wild west show.

Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Wild west shows
Places
West (U.S.)
People
Pawnee Bill, 1860-1942
St. Patrick's Costume Ball

This flyer from Chicago's Dill Pickle Club announces a costume ball on St. Patrick's Day, 1925. Oral histories suggest that masquerade balls at this and other clubs were an important part of the early community of gay men and lesbians in Chicago. Under cover of the party, women could dress as men and men as women. With so many people cross-dressing, few took notice of same sex couples. Although the Dill Pickle Club closed early in the 1930s, citywide Halloween Balls continued to be meeting places for gay men and lesbians into the 1940s.

Date
1925
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Homosexuality
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
The Liberty Belle: She's Cracked

A woman dressed in flapper fashion delivers a speech from a soapbox. She points to a sign reading “Liberate the Libido,” a reference to the growing popularity of the work of Austrian psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud who argued, in part, that repressed sexual feelings could manifest themselves in antisocial behavior. A handwritten note at the bottom of the cartoon comments: “A typical scene at the Dill Pickle Club.”

Subjects
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Plain Crees driving buffaloes into a pound

This illustration accompanies Henry Hind's description of how Cree Indians captured buffalo for slaughter. In the distance a circular “pound” or corral is visible.

Date
1860
Subjects
Cree Indians
Hunting
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
Manitoba
For Pike's Peak Ho!

As this advertisement explains, the trip from western Missouri to Denver took more than six days by stagecoach in the 1860s. The advent of rail travel would greatly speed transcontinental travel in the late 19th century.

Creator
Central Overland, California and Pike's Peak Express Co.
Date
[1860]
Subjects
Postal service
Transportation
Places
California
Colorado
Missouri
Book binding from Henry Howe's _The Great West_

The binding of this volume depicts a frontiersman clearing land in the center, a family traveling by covered wagon at the top, and a farmer harvesting grain at the bottom. Together the three scenes make a statement about the history of the North American West similar to the famous “Frontier Thesis” of Frederick Jackson Turner.

Date
1860
Subjects
Books and reading
Visions of history
Heroism of a Pioneer Woman

A tableau of frontier violence. This image accompanied the tale of a 1791 attack on the John Merrill home in Kentucky in which Mrs. Merrill killed five attackers with her ax. Along with stories of white settlers taken captive by American Indians, images like this portrayed settlers as victims of Indian aggression and celebrated the strength of settler women as a sign of the strength of the young American nation.

Date
1860
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Gender and society
Indians of North America
Violence
Places
Mississippi River Valley
West (U.S.)
Fishing Lakes, Qu' Appelle River

Henry Youle Hind, a chemistry and geology professor at Toronto's Trinity College, led an expedition that explored the Red and Assiniboine Rivers in southern Manitoba and the Qu'Appelle River in southern Saskatchewan. Hind's travel accounts, along with those of the contemporaneous Palliser expedition (1857-1860), helped promote the idea of Canada's prairies as a site for future colonization.

Creator
Hind, Henry Youle, 1823-1908
Date
1860
Subjects
Fishing
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
Manitoba