8 results for “Black, Timuel”

UPI Press wire demonstration at the _Chicago Sun-Times_ regarding editorial "Now that the March is Over," August 29, 1963

While returning to Chicago by train from the 1963 March on Washington, some civil rights activists read a Sun-Times editorial critical of Martin Luther King, Jr., and other leaders. As this newswire transcript recounts, some 300 activists marched directly from the train station to the Sun-Times building to picket. The newspaper's editors agreed to meet with leaders of the protest.

Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Washington D.C.
People
Black, Timuel
If You Are Bound to Go to the Gold Fields of the Black Hills

The discovery of gold in the Black Hills of the Dakota Territory drew thousands of fortune-seekers, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad hoped they would all be paying passengers on their lines. Gold mining in the Black Hills also touched off many years of violence between the Sioux who claimed the territory and the U.S. government, which sought to protect the interests of white settlers and miners.

Creator
Chicago and North Western Railway Company
Date
ca. 1877
Subjects
Gold Mining
Railroads
Places
Black Hills (S.D. and Wyo.)
Cheyenne camp attacked at Powder River

From a Cheyenne ledger book, probably illustrated between 1877 and 1879, containing drawings by Black Horse and other Cheyenne warriors. The Black Horse ledger book is part of a long tradition of the Plains Indians of chronicling their lives pictorially, first on buffalo hides, and later on the blank pages of ledger books obtained from U.S. soldiers, traders, missionaries, and reservation employees.

Date
ca. 1876
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Horsemanship
Indian ledger drawings
Indians of North America
Places
Great Plains
People
Black Horse (Cheyenne)
War Party Coming Home

From a Cheyenne ledger book, probably illustrated between 1877 and 1879, containing drawings by Black Horse and other Cheyenne warrior artists of scenes of warfare, hunting, and courtship. The Black Horse ledger book forms part of a long tradition of the Plains Indians of chronicling their lives pictorially, first on buffalo hides, and later, between 1865 and 1935, on the blank pages of ledger books obtained from U.S. soldiers, traders, missionaries, and reservation employees.

Date
ca 1877-79
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Horsemanship
Indian ledger drawings
Indians of North America
Places
Great Plains
People
Black Horse (Cheyenne)
White Scout

From a Cheyenne ledger book, probably illustrated between 1877 and 1879, containing drawings by Black Horse and other Cheyenne warrior artists of scenes of warfare, hunting, and courtship. The Black Horse ledger book forms part of a long tradition of the Plains Indians of chronicling their lives pictorially, first on buffalo hides, and later, between 1865 and 1935, on the blank pages of ledger books obtained from U.S. soldiers, traders, missionaries, and reservation employees.

Date
ca. 1877-79
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Horsemanship
Indian ledger drawings
Indians of North America
Places
Great Plains
People
Black Horse (Cheyenne)
Photograph of Lucy Parsons

Parsons self-identified as Native American and Chicana. Her family said she was black. Parsons grew up in Texas where she met Albert Richard Parsons in 1869. They married in 1872, although there is not a marriage license on record, and they moved to Chicago in 1873. Lucy Parsons was a prominent figure in Chicago's anarchist and radical labor circles until her death in 1942.

Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Parsons, Lucy
Chicago in 1832

This image was published in 1893 when Chicago had a population of more than a million people. A caption at the bottom reads: “This drawing taken by George Davis, a well known resident of Chicago, is a faithful landscape of the locality at the junction of the two branches of the Chicago River, then called Wolf's Point. The building on the left was a Tavern kept by Elijah Wentworth, where Gen. Scott made his headquarters during the Black Hawk War. That on the right was the Miller House. Each of them being used, as necessities might require, for Sunday Services, School Houses, Taverns and private residences. Except the Fort, they were the two most notable buildings of the place.”

Creator
Davis, George
Date
ca. 1893
Subjects
Visions of history
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Memorandum regarding the Till murder trial, September 13, 1955, _Chicago Sun-Times_.

While visiting his relatives in Mississippi during the summer of 1955, fourteen-year old Chicagoan Emmett Till was lynched for allegedly whistling at a white woman. Till's mother insisted on bringing her son's body back to Chicago and having an open casket funeral. Thousands of black Chicagoans came to bear witness to his brutal killing, and Jet magazine published dramatic images of Till's battered body. The state of Mississippi brought charges of murder against two white men, and an all-white jury quickly found them not guilty. The Department of Justice has recently re-opened an investigation into the case.

Date
1955
Subjects
African American Life
Civil rights
Journalism
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Southern States
People
Till, Emmitt