13 results for “Black Horse (Cheyenne)”

The Massacre of United States Troops by the Sioux and Cheyenne Indians Near Fort Philip Kearney, Dakotah Territory, December 22nd, 1866

In 1866 U. S. soldiers sought to defend three recently built forts protecting the Bozeman Trail leading to the gold fields of Montana. Lieutenant Colonel W. J. Fetterman led eighty men against the Sioux, expecting an easy victory, and he and all his soldiers were killed. A peace treaty was concluded in 1868.

Date
January 19, 1867
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Indians of North America
Sioux
Places
Dakota Territory
Buffalo Bill's Duel With Yellow Hand

Buffalo Bill interrupted his stage career in 1876 to become an army scout. He took the scalp of a Cheyenne warrior, Yellow Hair, whose name was mistranslated as Yellow Hand. Cody incorporated this story into his performances when he returned to the stage, and displayed Yellow Hand's scalp as a mark of authenticity.

Date
1881
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Cheyenne Indians
Frontier and pioneer life
Places
Great Plains
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Yellow Hand, 1850?-1876
Cheyenne camp attacked at Powder River

From a Cheyenne ledger book, probably illustrated between 1877 and 1879, containing drawings by Black Horse and other Cheyenne warriors. The Black Horse ledger book is part of a long tradition of the Plains Indians of chronicling their lives pictorially, first on buffalo hides, and later on the blank pages of ledger books obtained from U.S. soldiers, traders, missionaries, and reservation employees.

Date
ca. 1876
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Horsemanship
Indian ledger drawings
Indians of North America
Places
Great Plains
People
Black Horse (Cheyenne)
If You Are Bound to Go to the Gold Fields of the Black Hills

The discovery of gold in the Black Hills of the Dakota Territory drew thousands of fortune-seekers, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad hoped they would all be paying passengers on their lines. Gold mining in the Black Hills also touched off many years of violence between the Sioux who claimed the territory and the U.S. government, which sought to protect the interests of white settlers and miners.

Creator
Chicago and North Western Railway Company
Date
ca. 1877
Subjects
Gold Mining
Railroads
Places
Black Hills (S.D. and Wyo.)
War Party Coming Home

From a Cheyenne ledger book, probably illustrated between 1877 and 1879, containing drawings by Black Horse and other Cheyenne warrior artists of scenes of warfare, hunting, and courtship. The Black Horse ledger book forms part of a long tradition of the Plains Indians of chronicling their lives pictorially, first on buffalo hides, and later, between 1865 and 1935, on the blank pages of ledger books obtained from U.S. soldiers, traders, missionaries, and reservation employees.

Date
ca 1877-79
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Horsemanship
Indian ledger drawings
Indians of North America
Places
Great Plains
People
Black Horse (Cheyenne)
White Scout

From a Cheyenne ledger book, probably illustrated between 1877 and 1879, containing drawings by Black Horse and other Cheyenne warrior artists of scenes of warfare, hunting, and courtship. The Black Horse ledger book forms part of a long tradition of the Plains Indians of chronicling their lives pictorially, first on buffalo hides, and later, between 1865 and 1935, on the blank pages of ledger books obtained from U.S. soldiers, traders, missionaries, and reservation employees.

Date
ca. 1877-79
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Horsemanship
Indian ledger drawings
Indians of North America
Places
Great Plains
People
Black Horse (Cheyenne)
Cover of program for Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World

A program from Cody's Wild West Show at the World's Columbian Exposition. These dramatic open air performances highlighted the horse riding and shooting skills of Euro-American and American Indian performers, and claimed to recreate historical events such as the Battle of Little Big Horn.

Date
1893
Subjects
Theater
Wild west shows
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Chicago in 1832

This image was published in 1893 when Chicago had a population of more than a million people. A caption at the bottom reads: “This drawing taken by George Davis, a well known resident of Chicago, is a faithful landscape of the locality at the junction of the two branches of the Chicago River, then called Wolf's Point. The building on the left was a Tavern kept by Elijah Wentworth, where Gen. Scott made his headquarters during the Black Hawk War. That on the right was the Miller House. Each of them being used, as necessities might require, for Sunday Services, School Houses, Taverns and private residences. Except the Fort, they were the two most notable buildings of the place.”

Creator
Davis, George
Date
ca. 1893
Subjects
Visions of history
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Wild Rivalries of Savage, Barbarous and Civilized Races

Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West show highlighted the horse-riding traditions of many countries, while always depicting white Americans as the most advanced. The three-way division of races between “savage” (Indians), “barbarous” (non-Christian), and “civilized” (white Europeans) was a common feature of racialist thinking at the turn of the 20th century.

Creator
Courier Litho. Co.
Date
c . 1896
Subjects
Race
Wild west shows
Chief American Horse, Northern Cheyenne

Oil on canvas. Signed “E.A. Burbank, Lame Deer, Mont., 1897.”

Creator
Burbank, E. A. (Elbridge Ayer), 1858-1949
Date
1897
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Places
Montana
People
American Horse, Dakota Chief, 1840-1908