8 results for “August 1914”

Capitalism, Humanity, Government

Chicago's anarchist community participated in a national and international debate about the nature of state power in modern society. This cover of Emma Goldman's Mother Earth magazine, drawn by the Dada artist Man Ray, depicts humanity torn apart by capitalism and government, each a different manifestation of the same monstrous reality. Although published in New York City, Mother Earth reported regularly on the activities of Chicago anarchists, and Goldman spent a good deal of time in the city.

Creator
Man Ray
Date
August 1914
People
Goldman, Emma
Emancipation Parade in Windsor, Ontario

In the 1930s residents of Windsor, Ontario, began celebrating Britain's 1833 Emancipation Act, which officially banned slavery in Canada and other parts of the British Empire.

Date
1952
Subjects
Emancipation
Places
Canada
Ontario
Letter from Margery Currey to Eunice Tietjens, August 8, 1912

This letter between two women of Chicago's early 20th century literary community, recounts Currey's participation in the Progressive Party convention of 1912. At the time Currey was married to the writer and critic Floyd Dell, and the couple's home was the scene of regular meetings to discuss literary, cultural, and political issues.

Date
1912
Subjects
Gender and society
Suffrage
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Currey, Margery
Tietjens, Eunice
UPI Press wire demonstration at the _Chicago Sun-Times_ regarding editorial "Now that the March is Over," August 29, 1963

While returning to Chicago by train from the 1963 March on Washington, some civil rights activists read a Sun-Times editorial critical of Martin Luther King, Jr., and other leaders. As this newswire transcript recounts, some 300 activists marched directly from the train station to the Sun-Times building to picket. The newspaper's editors agreed to meet with leaders of the protest.

Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Washington D.C.
People
Black, Timuel
J. W. Noseworthy and his class at the Hollinger Mine

A group of immigrant miners learns English in a “Frontier College” classroom. During the early 20th century, Canadian mining, timber, and railroad companies recruited thousands of young men from Europe to work as wage laborers. Living in remote work camps, workers endured difficult conditions and had little contact with mainstream Canadian society. The “Frontier College” was an effort to bring Canadian culture to these workers, teach them English, and discourage radicalism. Young Canadian men, like J.W. Noseworthy pictured here, lived and worked alongside immigrants, and during the evening offered classes and access to reading materials.

Date
1914
Subjects
Education
Immigration
Places
Canada
Ontario
Cover of _Buffalo Bill With General Custer_

Prentiss Ingraham, a prolific dime novel writer, worked briefly as an advance agent for Buffalo Bill's show in the 1880s, and wrote hundreds of cheap popular novels about Buffalo Bill.

Creator
Ingraham, Prentiss, 1843-1904
Date
1914
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Portrait of Jack Jones, 1919

A portrait of Jack Jones by Polish immigrant artist Stanislaus Szukalski. A Canadian by birth, and a one-time labor organizer, Jones managed the Dill Pickle Club in Chicago from 1914 to 1931. His friend and collaborator Szukalski, who maintained a studio nearby, was a modernist painter and sculptor and part of the city's bohemian cultural scene. The portrait appeared in an article about Jones by the novelist Sherwood Anderson (image #137).

Creator
Szukalski, Stanislaus
Date
1919
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Immigration
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Margaret Sanger's Chicago speaking engagements, 1916

In 1913 and 1914 New Yorker Margaret Sanger published several articles on birth control, venereal disease, and women's rights that resulted in federal obscenity charges against her. When the charges were dropped in 1916 Sanger toured the country giving lectures promoting birth control. Chicagoan Margaret C. Anderson, editor of The Little Review, was an ardent supporter of birth control, and used her magazine to promote Sanger's lectures.

Date
1916
Subjects
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)