67 results for “American Railway Union”

The Riot at Forty-Ninth Street, 1894

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Scene of Destruction and Pillage in the Panhandle Yards

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
July 8, 1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
King Debs

In May of 1894, during a severe economic depression, members of the newly formed American Railway Union went on strike to protest the Pullman Company's refusal to reduce rental rates in company housing to match wage cuts. The union, led by Eugene V. Debs, called for a nationwide boycott on handling and repairing Pullman sleeping cars. Business and government leaders felt that a national railroad strike was tantamount to insurrection because it disrupted trade and mail delivery. Federal troops entered Chicago in July to end the strike.

Creator
Rogers, W. A.
Date
1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
People
Debs, Eugene V. (Eugene Victor), 1855-1926
If You Are Bound to Go to the Gold Fields of the Black Hills

The discovery of gold in the Black Hills of the Dakota Territory drew thousands of fortune-seekers, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad hoped they would all be paying passengers on their lines. Gold mining in the Black Hills also touched off many years of violence between the Sioux who claimed the territory and the U.S. government, which sought to protect the interests of white settlers and miners.

Creator
Chicago and North Western Railway Company
Date
ca. 1877
Subjects
Gold Mining
Railroads
Places
Black Hills (S.D. and Wyo.)
Advertisement for Buffalo Bill's Wild West

One of many posters advertising William Cody's Wild West Show as a re-enactment of Euro-American conflict with American Indians.

Date
April 27, 1893
Subjects
Advertising
Wild west shows
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Chicago's Interracial Debating Classic, January 25, 1931

Before the advent of television, lectures and debates provided public entertainment. Social activists used these venues to present their ideas and to educate their constituencies. This flyer promotes a debate involving A. Philip Randolph and Chandler Owen, both leaders of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP), as optimists, and Ben Reitman and David Tullman, both white radicals associated with the Dill Pickle Club, as pessimists. Although the exact topic of the debate is unclear, both sides supported unionization as well as racial integration. In 1931, the BSCP was engaged in a campaign to gain formal recognition as the union of African American porters and maids who worked on Pullman sleeping cars.

Date
1931
Subjects
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Dill Pickle Club
Education
Labor
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Randolph, A. Phillip
Reitman, Ben
Front View of the American Fur Company Buildings, Fond du Lac

Thomas McKenney accompanied Lewis Cass, the governor of the Michigan Territory, to the far west of Lake Superior during the summer of 1826 to meet with American Indian leaders and search for the source of the Mississippi River. This drawing shows the American Fur Trading Company post including a fenced garden area. In his description of the post, McKenney identified separate cemetaries for whites and American Indians behind the garden.

Date
1827
Subjects
Agriculture
American Fur Company
Fur trade
Places
Fond du Lac (Duluth, Minn.)
Woman with child in Union Station

A woman and child sit in the waiting room of Chicago's Union Station, 1948.

Creator
Esther Bubley
Date
1948
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Children
Railroads
Transportation
Places
Chicago, Illinois
American Indian Center, 5th Annual American Indian Pow-Wow

Organized in 1953, Chicago's American Indian Center promoted a sense of community among Indians from diverse tribal groups. The annual pow-wow is an opportunity to showcase Indian dancing, music, and the arts and a time for community members to discuss political issues.

Date
1958
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Cover of program for Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World

A program from Cody's Wild West Show at the World's Columbian Exposition. These dramatic open air performances highlighted the horse riding and shooting skills of Euro-American and American Indian performers, and claimed to recreate historical events such as the Battle of Little Big Horn.

Date
1893
Subjects
Theater
Wild west shows
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917