8 results for “1909”

Woman's Protest Against Woman Suffrage

Chicago novelist Caroline F. Corbin considered socialism and women's suffrage closely allied evils. Together, she believed, the two would undermine the traditional family and ultimately harm women. In 1897, Corbin formed the Illinois Association Opposed to the Extension of Suffrage to Women (IAOESW). In this tract, IAOESW argues that imposing the obligations of suffrage upon women will undermine their ability to fulfill their civic responsibilities as mothers and wives. Instead, it argues that women are fully represented by the votes of their husbands, brothers, and sons.

Creator
Illinois Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage
Date
1909
Subjects
Gender and society
Political campaigns
Suffrage
William Jennings Bryan

Born in Illinois, William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) made his political career in Nebraska. Known as the Great Commoner, he ran unsuccessfully as a Democrat for U.S. President three times. As the leader of the Democratic Party between 1896 and 1912 he forged alliances with agrarian Populists and the labor movement. As Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson he resigned to protest what he considered the President's lack of neutrality toward the war in Europe. Later in life Bryan became a vocal critic of the theory of evolution, and an ally of the emerging Christian fundamentalist movement. In 1925 he assisted with the prosecution of Tennessee biology teacher John Scopes, facing off with Chicago lawyer Clarence Darrow.

Date
1909
Subjects
Politics
Religion
People
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925
Chicago Under the Mob

When Frederic Remington wrote and illustrated this article about labor unrest in Chicago he was already a well-known for his images of western themes. The text describes Chicago's immigrant workers as an uncivilized and violent mob. The troops sent to restore order, Remington points out, had recently participated in the massacre of Native Americans at Wounded Knee, South Dakota.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1895
Subjects
Labor
Pullman Company
Pullman Strike, 1894
Working class
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Mexican Vaquero

Dodge wrote, “The American cowboy has a Mexican cousin, the vaquero, who does cow-punching in Chihuahua, and raises horses for the Mexican cavalry and occasional shipment across the Rio Grande. The vaquero is generally a peon, and as lazy, shiftless, and unreliable vagabond as men held to involuntary servitude are wont to be. He is essentially a low-down fellow in his habitats and instincts. Anything is grub to him which is not poison, and he will thrive on offal which no human being except a starving savage will touch.” (p. 124).

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Cowboys
Horsemanship
An Indian trapper

A depiction of an Indian on horseback in a mountainous landscape. Theodore Dodge described the “Indian Trapper” as a common character in the northern Rocky Mountains before the 1860s: a contract worker for the Hudson's Bay Company hunting furs for the European market.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Fur trade
Horsemanship
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
A White trapper

Theodore Dodge described the “white trapper” as a romantic historical type in terms similar to Frederick Jackson Turner's story of the frontier: “the first man who discovered the immense extent to which the peltry traffic could be carried was a rover of broad views, who most likely hailed from Kentucky or Missouri, was of French or Scotch-Irish descent, and perchance came from the Alleghenies in the footsteps of Daniel Boone, intent on adventure or flying from civilization.”

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Fur trade
Horsemanship
United States Cavalryman

Dodge wrote of Remington's illustration: “When in the field the cavalryman is allowed some latitude in suiting his dress to his own ideas of comfort, while kept within certain regulation bounds. It is thus our artist has represented him. He is apt to wear a soft hat — there is no better campaigning hat than the slouch, as thousands of soldiers can testify — and boots ad lib.; his uniform is patterned on his own individuality after a few days march. His enormous saddle-bags are much better filled at the start than at the finish, and a couple of canteens with the indispensable tin cup are slung at the cantle. His saber he considers less useful than a revolver, and in a charge it is a question whether the latter be not by far the preferable weapon.” (p. 66)

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Horsemanship
Places
West (U.S.)
Canadian Mounted Police

One in a series of drawings by Frederic Remington depicting different Western types.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Police
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Soldiers
Places
Canada