10 results for “1894”

King Debs

In May of 1894, during a severe economic depression, members of the newly formed American Railway Union went on strike to protest the Pullman Company's refusal to reduce rental rates in company housing to match wage cuts. The union, led by Eugene V. Debs, called for a nationwide boycott on handling and repairing Pullman sleeping cars. Business and government leaders felt that a national railroad strike was tantamount to insurrection because it disrupted trade and mail delivery. Federal troops entered Chicago in July to end the strike.

Creator
Rogers, W. A.
Date
1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
People
Debs, Eugene V. (Eugene Victor), 1855-1926
The Riot at Forty-Ninth Street, 1894

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Chicago Under the Mob

When Frederic Remington wrote and illustrated this article about labor unrest in Chicago he was already a well-known for his images of western themes. The text describes Chicago's immigrant workers as an uncivilized and violent mob. The troops sent to restore order, Remington points out, had recently participated in the massacre of Native Americans at Wounded Knee, South Dakota.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1895
Subjects
Labor
Pullman Company
Pullman Strike, 1894
Working class
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Canadian Mounted Police

One in a series of drawings by Frederic Remington depicting different Western types.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Police
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Soldiers
Places
Canada
A White trapper

Theodore Dodge described the “white trapper” as a romantic historical type in terms similar to Frederick Jackson Turner's story of the frontier: “the first man who discovered the immense extent to which the peltry traffic could be carried was a rover of broad views, who most likely hailed from Kentucky or Missouri, was of French or Scotch-Irish descent, and perchance came from the Alleghenies in the footsteps of Daniel Boone, intent on adventure or flying from civilization.”

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Fur trade
Horsemanship
An Indian trapper

A depiction of an Indian on horseback in a mountainous landscape. Theodore Dodge described the “Indian Trapper” as a common character in the northern Rocky Mountains before the 1860s: a contract worker for the Hudson's Bay Company hunting furs for the European market.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Fur trade
Horsemanship
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
Scene of Destruction and Pillage in the Panhandle Yards

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
July 8, 1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Mexican Vaquero

Dodge wrote, “The American cowboy has a Mexican cousin, the vaquero, who does cow-punching in Chihuahua, and raises horses for the Mexican cavalry and occasional shipment across the Rio Grande. The vaquero is generally a peon, and as lazy, shiftless, and unreliable vagabond as men held to involuntary servitude are wont to be. He is essentially a low-down fellow in his habitats and instincts. Anything is grub to him which is not poison, and he will thrive on offal which no human being except a starving savage will touch.” (p. 124).

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Cowboys
Horsemanship
United States Cavalryman

Dodge wrote of Remington's illustration: “When in the field the cavalryman is allowed some latitude in suiting his dress to his own ideas of comfort, while kept within certain regulation bounds. It is thus our artist has represented him. He is apt to wear a soft hat — there is no better campaigning hat than the slouch, as thousands of soldiers can testify — and boots ad lib.; his uniform is patterned on his own individuality after a few days march. His enormous saddle-bags are much better filled at the start than at the finish, and a couple of canteens with the indispensable tin cup are slung at the cantle. His saber he considers less useful than a revolver, and in a charge it is a question whether the latter be not by far the preferable weapon.” (p. 66)

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Horsemanship
Places
West (U.S.)
Gilpin's Hydrographic Map of North America

William Gilpin moved west from Philadelphia in the 1830s, and became an indefatigable promoter of the West as a lecturer, writer, and as editor of the Missouri Daily Argus. He saw America as destined to become the center of the next great phase of civilization, and saw the Mississippi Valley as the heart of that civilization. Gilpin's 1848 hydrographic map enlarged the Mississippi basin and pushed the Rocky Mountains west of their actual position. In 1861 he became the first governor of the Colorado Territory.

Creator
Gilpin, William, 1813-1894
Date
1848