4 results for “1884”

Imaginary view of the site of Chicago in 1779

This vision of some of Chicago's earliest residents was the first image in A.T. Andreas' 1886 History of Chicago. The caption notes, the site was then known as “Eschicago” and identifies the building on the north shore of the river as the cabin of Afro-French trader Jean Baptiste Point De Sable. Since the 1600s the area around the mouth of the Chicago River had been a trading ground for various Native American groups, French traders, and their mixed-race descendants.

Creator
Andreas, A. T. (Alfred Theodore), 1839-1900
Date
1884
Subjects
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Visions of history
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Custer's Last Rally

In the preface to the book, the author, T. M. Newson, claims, “Most scenes described, and nearly all the incidents narrated, in the pages of this book, were part of my own personal experience of a residence of some thirty years on the frontier, and for which I can vouch as true, except, perhaps, the incidents of the last great battle of the lamented Custer with Sitting Bull, and for these I am indebted to one who was early on the ground after the conflict, and who has obtained from the Indians themselves what I deem to be a very accurate picture of the terrible struggle between contending forces.”

Date
1884
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Indians of North America
Places
Little Bighorn Battlefield (Mont.)
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Sitting Bull, 1834?-1890
Section of Du Pratz's Map of Louisiana, 1757

The 1757 book A History of Louisiana by Antoine Le Page Du Pratz was among the few books carried with the Lewis & Clark expedition across the North American continent. Du Pratz had lived in present-day Louisiana and Mississippi in the early 1700s and his book described geographic and natural features of the region, including second hand accounts of travels deep into the Great Plains. This section of Du Pratz's map of central North America appeared in a history of Chicago from the 1880s.

Date
1886
Subjects
Mapping
Places
Louisiana
Mississippi River Valley
Eunice Tietjens

Eunice Hammond Tietjens (1884-1944) poses in a robe that suggests her interest in the cultures of Asia. Tietjens was long associated with the literary and artistic circle around Harriet Monroe's Poetry Magazine. The daughter of a prominent family, she had an unconventional education in Europe, traveled to Japan, China, and the South Pacific as an adult, and developed an interest in eastern philosophies and religions. At different times she was a poet, novelist, journalist, author of children's books, lecturer, and editor.

Subjects
Literature
Places
Chicago, Illinois
People
Tietjens, Eunice