7 results for “1872”

The Switzerland of America

Appearing in a guidebook, “How to Go West,” this advertisement celebrated the healthful climate and natural beauty of the Rocky Mountains as “The Switzerland of America.”

Date
1872
Subjects
Railroads
Tourism
Places
Colorado
Great Plains
Homesteads and Pre-Emptions

During the late 19th century the U.S. government aided settlement of farm farmers on the Great Plains by offering land at very low prices to those who would establish farms. As this description of the process indicates, immigrants seeking homestead land were required to declared their intention to become American citizen. For European immigrants this was a very small barrier.

Date
1872
Subjects
Agriculture
Immigration
Railroads
Places
Great Plains
Kansas
Nebraska
View of Burlington

A view from the south of the town of Burlington, Iowa. Paddle wheel boats navigate the Mississippi River while others dock at the shore. In the foreground a locomotive crosses the iron bridge spanning the river. Steeples of the town's many churches are visible along the skyline. Printed in the guidebook “How to Go West,” the image suggests opportunities for work, trade, and community for those moving west.

Date
1872
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Railroads
Places
Iowa
Mississippi River
Views of the Big Blue, South of Seward, Nebraska

Appearing in a guide for potential settlers, “How to Go West,” these images of rolling prairie in eastern Nebraska suggest both prosperous farms and open land for newcomers. Railroads crossing the Great Plains often advertised the availability of good land in areas served by their lines.

Date
1872
Subjects
Advertisement
Agriculture
Railroads
Places
Great Plains
Nebraska
Sleeping on the Burlington Route and Eating on the Burlington Route

Printed in a guidebook, “How to Go West,” these advertisements for Pullman cars stressed elegance, comfort, and speed. Pullman cars changed the nature of rail travel for middle and upper class travelers.

Date
1872
Subjects
Advertisement
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Pullman cars
Railroads
Tourism
Items for Passengers Going Across the Continent

A page from the guidebook “How to Go West” details the prices for passengers and freight traveling across North America in the early 1870s. Sleeping cars were reserved for 1st class passengers only. Second class and emigrant class passengers rode in less elegant accommodations and were advised to bring “a lunch basket” for a trip lasting several days from Omaha to San Francisco.

Date
1872
Subjects
Advertisement
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Pullman cars
Railroads
Tourism
Photograph of Lucy Parsons

Parsons self-identified as Native American and Chicana. Her family said she was black. Parsons grew up in Texas where she met Albert Richard Parsons in 1869. They married in 1872, although there is not a marriage license on record, and they moved to Chicago in 1873. Lucy Parsons was a prominent figure in Chicago's anarchist and radical labor circles until her death in 1942.

Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Parsons, Lucy